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Pancreatic Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Pancreatic Cancer

  1. Pancreatic Cancer Treatments by Stage

    WebMD looks into both routinely used and emerging treatments for pancreatic cancer.

  2. Pancreatic Cancer Overview

    WebMD explains pancreatic cancer, including types, statistics, and risk factors.

  3. Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - To Learn More About Pancreatic Cancer

    For more information from the National Cancer Institute about pancreatic cancer, see the following:Pancreatic Cancer Home PageWhat You Need to Know About™ Cancer of the PancreasUnusual Cancers of ChildhoodDrugs Approved for Pancreatic CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: Targeted Therapies (Advances in Targeted Therapies)Targeted Cancer TherapiesFor general cancer information and other resources from the National Cancer Institute, see the following:What You Need to Know About™ CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: CancerCancer StagingChemotherapy and You: Support for People With CancerRadiation Therapy and You: Support for People With CancerCoping with Cancer: Supportive and Palliative CareQuestions to Ask Your Doctor About CancerCancer LibraryInformation For Survivors/Caregivers/Advocates

  4. Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

    Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

  5. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors) Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

    About PDQPhysician Data Query (PDQ) is the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) comprehensive cancer information database. The PDQ database contains summaries of the latest published information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come in two versions. The health professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to-understand, nontechnical language. Both versions have cancer information that is accurate and up to date and most versions are also available in Spanish.PDQ is a service of the NCI. The NCI is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIH is the federal government's center of biomedical research. The PDQ summaries are based on an independent review of the medical literature. They are not policy statements of the NCI or the NIH.Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary has current

  6. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors) Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Options for Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    A link to a list of current clinical trials is included for each treatment section. For some types or stages of cancer, there may not be any trials listed. Check with your doctor for clinical trials that are not listed here but may be right for you.Gastrinoma Treatment of gastrinoma may include supportive care and the following:For symptoms caused by too much stomach acid, treatment may be a drug that decreases the amount of acid made by the stomach.For a single tumor in the head of the pancreas:Surgery to remove the tumor.Surgery to cut the nerve that causes stomach cells to make acid and treatment with a drug that decreases stomach acid.Surgery to remove the whole stomach (rare).For a single tumor in the body or tail of the pancreas, treatment is usually surgery to remove the body or tail of the pancreas.For several tumors in the pancreas, treatment is usually surgery to remove the body or tail of the pancreas. If tumor remains after surgery, treatment may include either:Surgery to

  7. Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stage I and Stage II Pancreatic Cancer Treatment

    Treatment Options for Stages I and II Pancreatic CancerTreatment options for stages I and II pancreatic cancer include the following:Surgery: radical pancreatic resection including:Whipple procedure (pancreaticoduodenal resection).Total pancreatectomy when necessary for adequate margins.Distal pancreatectomy for tumors of the body and tail of the pancreas.[1,2]Postoperative chemoradiation therapy: radical pancreatic resection followed by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy and radiation therapy.[3,4,5,6,7]Postoperative chemotherapy: radical pancreatic resection followed by chemotherapy (gemcitabine or 5-FU/leucovorin).[8]Surgery Complete resection can yield 5-year survival rates of 18% to 24%, but ultimate control remains poor because of the high incidence of both local and distant tumor recurrence.[9,10,11][Level of evidence: 3iA]Approximately 20% of patients present with pancreatic cancer amenable to local surgical resection, with operative mortality rates of

  8. Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer Treatment

    Treatment Options for Recurrent Pancreatic CancerTreatment options for recurrent pancreatic cancer include the following:Palliative therapy.Chemotherapy: fluorouracil [1] or gemcitabine.[2,3,4]Palliative therapyPalliative therapy for recurrent pancreatic cancer includes the following:Palliative surgical bypass procedures such as endoscopic or radiologically placed stents.[5,6]Palliative radiation procedures.Pain relief by celiac axis nerve or intrapleural block (percutaneous).[7]Other palliative medical care alone.ChemotherapyChemotherapy occasionally produces objective antitumor response, but the low percentage of significant responses and lack of survival advantage warrant use of therapies under evaluation.[8]Treatment Options Under Clinical Evaluation for Recurrent Pancreatic CancerTreatment options under clinical evaluation include the following:Phase I and II clinical trials evaluating pharmacologic modulation of fluorinated pyrimidines, new anticancer agents, or biological

  9. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors) Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Glucagonoma

    As with the other pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, the mainstay of therapy is surgical resection, and extended survival is possible even when the disease is metastatic. Resection of metastases is also a consideration when feasible.[1]Standard treatment options:Single small lesion in head or tail of pancreas:[1,2,3,4]Enucleation, if feasible.Large lesion in the head of the pancreas that is not amenable to enucleation:[1,2,3,4]Pancreaticoduodenectomy.Single large lesion in body/tail:[1,2,3,4]Distal pancreatectomy.Multiple lesions:[1,2,3,4]Enucleation, if feasible.Resect body and tail otherwise.Metastatic disease: lymph nodes or distant sites:[5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12]Resect when possible.Consider radiofrequency or cryosurgical ablation, if not resectable. Unresectable disease:[13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22]Combination chemotherapy.Somatostatin analogue therapy. Necrotizing erythema of glucagonoma may be relieved in 24 hours with somatostatin analogue, with nearly complete disappearance

  10. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors) Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Cellular Classification of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors)

    Table 1. Endocrine Tumors of the PancreasIslet CellsSecreted Active AgentTumor and SyndromeACTH = adrenocorticotropin; MSH = melanocyte-stimulating hormone; VIP = vasoactive intestinal peptide; WDHA = watery diarrhea, hypokalemia, and achlorhydria; 5-HT = serotonin.AlphaGlucagonGlucagonoma (diabetes, dermatitis)BetaInsulinInsulinoma (hypoglycemia)DeltaSomatostatinSomatostatinoma (mild diabetes); diarrhea/steatorrhea; gallstonesDGastrinGastrinoma (peptic ulcer disease)A -> DVIP and/or other undefined mediatorsWDHA5-HTACTHMSHCarcinoidCushing syndromeHyperpigmentationInteracinar CellsSecreted Active AgentTumor and SyndromeFPancreatic polypeptideMultiple hormonal syndromesEC5-HTCarcinoid

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