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Pancreatic Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Pancreatic Cancer

  1. Treatment Option Overview

    Localized DiseaseIf technically and medically feasible, primary management of endocrine tumors of the pancreas involves surgical resection with curative intent. Given the rare nature of these tumors, surgical approaches are based upon case series and expert opinion rather than randomized controlled trials.[1] The surgical options listed below are based on retrospective series from single reporting centers.[2,3,4][Level of evidence: 3iiD or 3iiiD] Adjuvant therapy has no proven benefit and is, therefore, investigational. There have been no well-controlled trials of adjuvant therapy after complete tumor resection.[5]Surgical Cytoreduction for MetastasesSurgery plays a role even in the setting of metastatic disease. The symptoms of metastatic functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) may be ameliorated by the reduction of overall tumor burden through surgical debulking.The liver is a common site of metastasis from pancreatic NETs. Because of the slow growth rate of many NETs,

  2. Gastrinoma

    The approach to treatment often depends on the results of preoperative localization studies and findings at exploratory laparotomy. At exploration, 85% of these tumors are found in the gastrinoma triangle with 40% on the surface of the pancreas and 40% outside of the pancreas. Only 15% are found within the substance of the pancreas. Percutaneous transhepatic venous sampling may occasionally provide accurate localization of single sporadic gastrinomas. Resection (enucleation of individual tumors, if technically feasible), and even excision of liver metastases, is associated with long-term cure or disease control.[1]Standard treatment options: Single lesion in head of the pancreas:[2,3,4,5]Enucleation.Parietal cell vagotomy and cimetidine.Total gastrectomy (rarely used with the advent of current therapies).Single or multiple lesions in the duodenum:[2,3,4,5]Pancreatoduodenectomy.Single lesion in body/tail of the pancreas:[2,3,4,5]Resection of body/tail.Multiple lesions in

  3. Stage I and Stage II Pancreatic Cancer Treatment

    Treatment Options for Stages I and II Pancreatic CancerTreatment options for stages I and II pancreatic cancer include the following:Surgery: radical pancreatic resection including:Whipple procedure (pancreaticoduodenal resection).Total pancreatectomy when necessary for adequate margins.Distal pancreatectomy for tumors of the body and tail of the pancreas.[1,2]Postoperative chemoradiation therapy: radical pancreatic resection followed by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy and radiation therapy.[3,4,5,6,7]Postoperative chemotherapy: radical pancreatic resection followed by chemotherapy (gemcitabine or 5-FU/leucovorin).[8]Surgery Complete resection can yield 5-year survival rates of 18% to 24%, but ultimate control remains poor because of the high incidence of both local and distant tumor recurrence.[9,10,11][Level of evidence: 3iA]Approximately 20% of patients present with pancreatic cancer amenable to local surgical resection, with operative mortality rates of

  4. Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer

    Recurrent pancreatic cancer is cancer that has recurred (come back) after it has been treated. The cancer may come back in the pancreas or in other parts of the body.

  5. Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer Treatment

    Treatment Options for Stage IV Pancreatic CancerTreatment options for stage IV pancreatic cancer include the following:Palliative therapy.Chemotherapy: gemcitabine; gemcitabine and erlotinib; or oxaliplatin, irinotecan, leucovorin, and fluorouracil (5-FU) (FOLFIRINOX).[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]Palliative therapyPalliative therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer includes the following:Pain-relieving procedures (e.g., celiac or intrapleural block) and supportive care.[11]Palliative surgical biliary bypass, percutaneous radiologic biliary stent placement, or endoscopically placed biliary stents.[12,13,14]ChemotherapyThe low objective response rate and lack of survival benefit with current chemotherapy indicates that clinical trials are appropriate treatment of all newly diagnosed patients. Occasionally, patients have palliation of symptoms when treated with chemotherapy with well-tested older drugs, such as 5-FU. Gemcitabine has demonstrated activity in patients with pancreatic

  6. nci_ncicdr0000062957-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Pancreatic Cancer Treatment

  7. nci_ncicdr0000062794-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors) Treatment

  8. About This PDQ Summary

    About PDQPhysician Data Query (PDQ) is the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) comprehensive cancer information database. The PDQ database contains summaries of the latest published information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come in two versions. The health professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to-understand, nontechnical language. Both versions have cancer information that is accurate and up to date and most versions are also available in Spanish.PDQ is a service of the NCI. The NCI is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIH is the federal government's center of biomedical research. The PDQ summaries are based on an independent review of the medical literature. They are not policy statements of the NCI or the NIH.Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary has current

  9. General Information About Pancreatic Cancer

    Pancreatic cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the pancreas. The pancreas is a gland about 6 inches long that is shaped like a thin pear lying on its side. The wider end of the pancreas is called the head,the middle section is called the body,and the narrow end is called the tail. The pancreas lies behind the stomach and in front of the spine. The ...

  10. Treatment Options by Stage

    A link to a list of current clinical trials is included for each treatment section. For some types or stages of cancer, there may not be any trials listed. Check with your doctor for clinical trials that are not listed here but may be right for you.Stages I and II Pancreatic CancerTreatment of stage I and stage II pancreatic cancer may include the following:Surgery.Surgery followed by chemotherapy.Surgery followed by chemoradiation.A clinical trial of combination chemotherapy.A clinical trial of chemotherapy and targeted therapy, with or without chemoradiation.A clinical trial of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy before surgery.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with stage I pancreatic cancer and stage II pancreatic cancer. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about

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