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    Pancreatic Cancer Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Pancreatic Cancer

    1. Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Recurrent and Progressive Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

      There is no established therapy for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors that recur or progress after prior therapy.[1] Deciding on further treatment depends on many factors, including:The specific cancer.Prior treatment.Site of recurrence.Individual patient considerations.Attempts at re-resection of local tumors that have recurred or metastatic lesions may offer palliation, when technically feasible. Intra-arterial chemotherapy is a consideration for patients with liver metastases. Patients with hepatic-dominant disease and substantial symptoms caused by tumor bulk or hormone-release syndromes may benefit from continuous-infusion intra-arterial chemotherapy or procedures that reduce hepatic arterial blood flow to metastases (hepatic arterial occlusion with embolization or with chemoembolization).[2,3,4,5,6,7] Such treatment may also be combined with systemic chemotherapy. A variety of systemic agents have shown biologic or palliative activity,[1,8] including:Somatostatin

    2. Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062678-nci-header

      This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors) Treatment

    3. Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062794-nci-header

      This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors) Treatment

    4. Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stage I and Stage II Pancreatic Cancer Treatment

      Treatment Options for Stages I and II Pancreatic CancerTreatment options for stages I and II pancreatic cancer include the following:Surgery: radical pancreatic resection including:Whipple procedure (pancreaticoduodenal resection).Total pancreatectomy when necessary for adequate margins.Distal pancreatectomy for tumors of the body and tail of the pancreas.[1,2]Postoperative chemoradiation therapy: radical pancreatic resection followed by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy and radiation therapy.[3,4,5,6,7]Postoperative chemotherapy: radical pancreatic resection followed by chemotherapy (gemcitabine or 5-FU/leucovorin).[8]Surgery Complete resection can yield 5-year survival rates of 18% to 24%, but ultimate control remains poor because of the high incidence of both local and distant tumor recurrence.[9,10,11][Level of evidence: 3iA]Approximately 20% of patients present with pancreatic cancer amenable to local surgical resection, with operative mortality rates of

    5. Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview

      Localized DiseaseIf technically and medically feasible, primary management of endocrine tumors of the pancreas involves surgical resection with curative intent. Given the rare nature of these tumors, surgical approaches are based upon case series and expert opinion rather than randomized controlled trials.[1] The surgical options listed below are based on retrospective series from single reporting centers.[2,3,4][Level of evidence: 3iiD or 3iiiD] Adjuvant therapy has no proven benefit and is, therefore, investigational. There have been no well-controlled trials of adjuvant therapy after complete tumor resection.[5]Surgical Cytoreduction for MetastasesSurgery plays a role even in the setting of metastatic disease. The symptoms of metastatic functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) may be ameliorated by the reduction of overall tumor burden through surgical debulking.The liver is a common site of metastasis from pancreatic NETs. Because of the slow growth rate of many NETs,

    6. Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062957-nci-header

      This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Pancreatic Cancer Treatment

    7. Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

      Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

    8. Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - To Learn More About Pancreatic Cancer

      For more information from the National Cancer Institute about pancreatic cancer, see the following:Pancreatic Cancer Home PageWhat You Need to Know About™ Cancer of the PancreasUnusual Cancers of ChildhoodDrugs Approved for Pancreatic CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: Targeted Therapies (Advances in Targeted Therapies)Targeted Cancer TherapiesFor general cancer information and other resources from the National Cancer Institute, see the following:What You Need to Know About™ CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: CancerCancer StagingChemotherapy and You: Support for People With CancerRadiation Therapy and You: Support for People With CancerCoping with Cancer: Supportive and Palliative CareQuestions to Ask Your Doctor About CancerCancer LibraryInformation For Survivors/Caregivers/Advocates

    9. Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (03 / 07 / 2014)

      The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.Editorial changes were made to this summary.This summary is written and maintained by the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of NCI. The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or NIH. More information about summary policies and the role of the PDQ Editorial Boards in maintaining the PDQ summaries can be found on the About This PDQ Summary and PDQ NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database pages.

    10. Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Stages of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

      The plan for cancer treatment depends on where the NET is found in the pancreas and whether it has spread. The process used to find out if cancer has spread within the pancreas or to other parts of the body is called staging. The results of the tests and procedures used to diagnose pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are also used to find out whether the cancer has spread. See the General Information section for a description of these tests and procedures. Although there is a standard staging system for pancreatic NETs, it is not used to plan treatment. Treatment of pancreatic NETs is based on the following: Whether the cancer is found in one place in the pancreas.Whether the cancer is found in several places in the pancreas.Whether the cancer has spread to lymph nodes near the pancreas or to other parts of the body such as the liver, lung, peritoneum, or bone.There are three ways that cancer spreads in the body.The three ways that cancer spreads in the body are:Through tissue.

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