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Pancreatic Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Pancreatic Cancer

  1. Treatment Options for Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer

    Treatment of recurrent pancreatic cancer may include the following:Palliative surgery or stent placement to bypass blocked areas in ducts or the small intestine.Palliative radiation therapy to shrink the tumor.Other palliative medical care to reduce symptoms, such as nerve blocks to relieve pain.Chemotherapy.Clinical trials of chemotherapy, new anticancer therapies, or biologic therapy.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with recurrent pancreatic cancer. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

  2. Cellular Classification of Pancreatic Cancer

    Pancreatic cancer includes the following carcinomas:MalignantDuct cell carcinoma (90% of all cases).Acinar cell carcinoma.Adenosquamous carcinoma.Cystadenocarcinoma (serous and mucinous types).Giant cell carcinoma.Invasive adenocarcinoma associated with cystic mucinous neoplasm or intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm.Mixed type (ductal-endocrine or acinar-endocrine).Mucinous carcinoma.Pancreatoblastoma.Papillary-cystic neoplasm (Frantz tumor). This tumor has lower malignant potential and may be cured with surgery alone.[1,2]Papillary mucinous carcinoma.Signet ring carcinoma.Small cell carcinoma.Unclassified.Undifferentiated carcinoma.Borderline Malignancies Intraductal papillary mucinous tumor with dysplasia.[3]Mucinous cystic tumor with dysplasia.Pseudopapillary solid tumor.References: Sanchez JA, Newman KD, Eichelberger MR, et al.: The papillary-cystic neoplasm of the pancreas. An increasingly recognized clinicopathologic entity. Arch Surg 125 (11): 1502-5, 1990. Warshaw AL,

  3. Recurrent and Progressive Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    There is no established therapy for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors that recur or progress after prior therapy.[1] Deciding on further treatment depends on many factors, including:The specific cancer.Prior treatment.Site of recurrence.Individual patient considerations.Attempts at re-resection of local tumors that have recurred or metastatic lesions may offer palliation, when technically feasible. Intra-arterial chemotherapy is a consideration for patients with liver metastases. Patients with hepatic-dominant disease and substantial symptoms caused by tumor bulk or hormone-release syndromes may benefit from continuous-infusion intra-arterial chemotherapy or procedures that reduce hepatic arterial blood flow to metastases (hepatic arterial occlusion with embolization or with chemoembolization).[2,3,4,5,6,7] Such treatment may also be combined with systemic chemotherapy. A variety of systemic agents have shown biologic or palliative activity,[1,8] including:Somatostatin

  4. Treatment Option Overview

    There are different types of treatment for patients with pancreatic NETs. Different types of treatments are available for patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.Six types of standard treatment are used:Surgery An operation may be done to remove the tumor. One of the following types of surgery may be used:Enucleation: Surgery to remove the tumor only. This may be done when cancer occurs in one place in the

  5. Stage Information for Pancreatic Cancer

    The staging system for pancreatic exocrine cancer continues to evolve. The importance of staging beyond establishing whether a tumor is resectable is uncertain since state-of-the-art treatment has demonstrated little impact on survival. However, knowledge of the extent of the disease is necessary to communicate a uniform definition of disease. AJCC Stage Groupings and TNM DefinitionsThe American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) has designated staging by TNM classification.[1]Table 1. Definitions of TNM Stage 0aStageTNMDescriptiona Reprinted with permission from AJCC: Exocrine and endocrine pancreas. In: Edge SB, Byrd DR, Compton CC, et al., eds.: AJCC Cancer Staging Manual. 7th ed. New York, NY: Springer, 2010, pp 241-9.b This also includes the pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN)-3 classification.0Tis, N0, M0Tis = Carcinomain situ.bN0 = No regional lymph node metastasis.M0 = No distant metastasis.Table 2. Definitions of TNM Stages IA and

  6. Get More Information From NCI

    Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

  7. Glucagonoma

    As with the other pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, the mainstay of therapy is surgical resection, and extended survival is possible even when the disease is metastatic. Resection of metastases is also a consideration when feasible.[1]Standard treatment options:Single small lesion in head or tail of pancreas:[1,2,3,4]Enucleation, if feasible.Large lesion in the head of the pancreas that is not amenable to enucleation:[1,2,3,4]Pancreaticoduodenectomy.Single large lesion in body/tail:[1,2,3,4]Distal pancreatectomy.Multiple lesions:[1,2,3,4]Enucleation, if feasible.Resect body and tail otherwise.Metastatic disease: lymph nodes or distant sites:[5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12]Resect when possible.Consider radiofrequency or cryosurgical ablation, if not resectable. Unresectable disease:[13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22]Combination chemotherapy.Somatostatin analogue therapy. Necrotizing erythema of glucagonoma may be relieved in 24 hours with somatostatin analogue, with nearly complete disappearance

  8. Treatment Option Overview

    There are different types of treatment for patients with pancreatic cancer. Different types of treatment are available for patients with pancreatic cancer. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment. Five types of standard treatment are used:Surgery One of the following types of surgery may be used to take out the tumor:Whipple procedure: A surgical procedure in which the head of the pancreas, the gallbladder, part of the stomach, part of the small intestine, and the bile duct are removed.

  9. Get More Information From NCI

    Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

  10. About This PDQ Summary

    Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about the treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (islet cell tumors). It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care decisions.Reviewers and UpdatesThis summary is reviewed regularly and updated as necessary by the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Board members review recently published articles each month to determine whether an article should:be discussed at a meeting,be cited with text, orreplace or update an existing article that is already cited.Changes to the summaries are

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