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    Pancreatic Cancer Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Pancreatic Cancer

    1. Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

      About PDQPhysician Data Query (PDQ) is the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) comprehensive cancer information database. The PDQ database contains summaries of the latest published information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come in two versions. The health professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to-understand, nontechnical language. Both versions have cancer information that is accurate and up to date and most versions are also available in Spanish.PDQ is a service of the NCI. The NCI is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIH is the federal government's center of biomedical research. The PDQ summaries are based on an independent review of the medical literature. They are not policy statements of the NCI or the NIH.Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary has current

    2. Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview

      There are different types of treatment for patients with pancreatic NETs. Different types of treatments are available for patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.Six types of standard treatment are used:Surgery An operation may be done to remove the tumor. One of the following types of surgery may be used:Enucleation: Surgery to remove the tumor only. This may be done when cancer occurs in one place in the

    3. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors) Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Miscellaneous Islet Cell Tumors

      VIPomaImmediate fluid resuscitation is often necessary to correct the electrolyte and fluid problems that occur as a result of the watery diarrhea, hypokalemia, and achlorhydria that patients experience. Somatostatin analogs are also used to ameliorate the large fluid and electrolyte losses. Once patients are stabilized, excision of the primary tumor and regional nodes is the first line of therapy for clinically localized disease. In the case of locally advanced or metastatic disease, where curative resection is not possible, debulking and removal of gross disease, including metastases, should be considered to alleviate the characteristic manifestations of VIP overproduction.[1] (Refer to the Treatment Option Overview section of this summary for information about the remaining principles of therapy.)SomatostatinomaComplete excision is the therapy of choice, if technically possible. However, metastases often preclude curative resection, and palliative debulking can be considered to

    4. Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - General Information About Pancreatic Cancer

      Related Summary Note: Another PDQ summary containing information related to pancreatic cancer includes: Unusual Cancers of Childhood (pancreatic cancer in children) Statistics Note: Estimated new cases and deaths from pancreatic cancer in the United States in 2010:[ 1 ] New cases: 43,140. Deaths: 36,800. Note: Some citations in the text of this section are followed by a level of evidence. The ...

    5. Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment Options by Stage

      A link to a list of current clinical trials is included for each treatment section. For some types or stages of cancer, there may not be any trials listed. Check with your doctor for clinical trials that are not listed here but may be right for you.Stages I and II Pancreatic CancerTreatment of stage I and stage II pancreatic cancer may include the following:Surgery.Surgery followed by chemotherapy.Surgery followed by chemoradiation.A clinical trial of combination chemotherapy.A clinical trial of chemotherapy and targeted therapy, with or without chemoradiation.A clinical trial of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy before surgery.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with stage I pancreatic cancer and stage II pancreatic cancer. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about

    6. Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment Options for Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer

      Treatment of recurrent pancreatic cancer may include the following:Palliative surgery or stent placement to bypass blocked areas in ducts or the small intestine.Palliative radiation therapy to shrink the tumor.Other palliative medical care to reduce symptoms, such as nerve blocks to relieve pain.Chemotherapy.Clinical trials of chemotherapy, new anticancer therapies, or biologic therapy.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with recurrent pancreatic cancer. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

    7. Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - General Information About Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors)

      Tumors of the endocrine pancreas are a collection of tumor cell types collectively referred to as pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). These tumors originate in islet cells. Although they may be similar or identical in histologic appearance to carcinoid tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, differences in their underlying biology and likely differences in response to therapeutic agents suggest that they should be treated and investigated as a distinct entity.[1] They are uncommon cancers with about 1,000 new cases per year in the United States.[2] They account for 3% to 5% of pancreatic malignancies and overall have a better prognosis than the more common pancreatic exocrine tumors.[2,3] Five-year survival is about 55% when the tumors are localized and resected but only about 15% when the tumors are not resectable.[3] Overall 5-year survival rate is about 42%.[2]Figure 1. Cancer of the Pancreas: Relative Survival Rates (%) by Histologic Subtype, Ages 20+, 12 SEER Areas,

    8. Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

      Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

    9. Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (07 / 31 / 2014)

      The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.This summary was reformatted.Stage I and Stage II Pancreatic Cancer TreatmentAdded text about a 5-year update of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-9704 trial, which reported that patients with pancreatic head tumors had a median survival and 5-year overall survival of 20.5 months and 22% survival rate with gemcitabine, versus 17.1 months and 18% with 5-fluorouracil. Also added text about a secondary analysis of RTOG-9704 that explored the correlation of adherence to protocol-specified radiation with patient outcomes. Added text to state that the European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer/U.S. Gastrointestinal Intergroup (RTOG-0848) phase III adjuvant trial evaluating the impact of chemoradiation after completion of a full course of gemcitabine with or without

    10. Pancreatic Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Gastrinoma

      The approach to treatment often depends on the results of preoperative localization studies and findings at exploratory laparotomy. At exploration, 85% of these tumors are found in the gastrinoma triangle with 40% on the surface of the pancreas and 40% outside of the pancreas. Only 15% are found within the substance of the pancreas. Percutaneous transhepatic venous sampling may occasionally provide accurate localization of single sporadic gastrinomas. Resection (enucleation of individual tumors, if technically feasible), and even excision of liver metastases, is associated with long-term cure or disease control.[1]Standard treatment options: Single lesion in head of the pancreas:[2,3,4,5]Enucleation.Parietal cell vagotomy and cimetidine.Total gastrectomy (rarely used with the advent of current therapies).Single or multiple lesions in the duodenum:[2,3,4,5]Pancreatoduodenectomy.Single lesion in body/tail of the pancreas:[2,3,4,5]Resection of body/tail.Multiple lesions in

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