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Pancreatic Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Pancreatic Cancer

  1. Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer Treatment

    Treatment Options for Stage IV Pancreatic CancerTreatment options for stage IV pancreatic cancer include the following:Palliative therapy.Chemotherapy: gemcitabine; gemcitabine and erlotinib; or oxaliplatin, irinotecan, leucovorin, and fluorouracil (5-FU) (FOLFIRINOX).[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]Palliative therapyPalliative therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer includes the following:Pain-relieving procedures (e.g., celiac or intrapleural block) and supportive care.[11]Palliative surgical biliary bypass, percutaneous radiologic biliary stent placement, or endoscopically placed biliary stents.[12,13,14]ChemotherapyThe low objective response rate and lack of survival benefit with current chemotherapy indicates that clinical trials are appropriate treatment of all newly diagnosed patients. Occasionally, patients have palliation of symptoms when treated with chemotherapy with well-tested older drugs, such as 5-FU. Gemcitabine has demonstrated activity in patients with pancreatic

  2. General Information About Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors)

    Tumors of the endocrine pancreas are a collection of tumor cell types collectively referred to as pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). These tumors originate in islet cells. Although they may be similar or identical in histologic appearance to carcinoid tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, differences in their underlying biology and likely differences in response to therapeutic agents suggest that they should be treated and investigated as a distinct entity.[1] They are uncommon cancers with about 1,000 new cases per year in the United States.[2] They account for 3% to 5% of pancreatic malignancies and overall have a better prognosis than the more common pancreatic exocrine tumors.[2,3] Five-year survival is about 55% when the tumors are localized and resected but only about 15% when the tumors are not resectable.[3] Overall 5-year survival rate is about 42%.[2]Figure 1. Cancer of the Pancreas: Relative Survival Rates (%) by Histologic Subtype, Ages 20+, 12 SEER Areas,

  3. Treatment Options by Stage

    A link to a list of current clinical trials is included for each treatment section. For some types or stages of cancer, there may not be any trials listed. Check with your doctor for clinical trials that are not listed here but may be right for you.Stages I and II Pancreatic CancerTreatment of stage I and stage II pancreatic cancer may include the following:Surgery.Surgery followed by chemotherapy.Surgery followed by chemoradiation.A clinical trial of combination chemotherapy.A clinical trial of chemotherapy and targeted therapy, with or without chemoradiation.A clinical trial of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy before surgery.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with stage I pancreatic cancer and stage II pancreatic cancer. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about

  4. About This PDQ Summary

    About PDQPhysician Data Query (PDQ) is the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) comprehensive cancer information database. The PDQ database contains summaries of the latest published information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come in two versions. The health professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to-understand, nontechnical language. Both versions have cancer information that is accurate and up to date and most versions are also available in Spanish.PDQ is a service of the NCI. The NCI is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIH is the federal government's center of biomedical research. The PDQ summaries are based on an independent review of the medical literature. They are not policy statements of the NCI or the NIH.Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary has current

  5. About This PDQ Summary

    Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about the treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (islet cell tumors). It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care decisions.Reviewers and UpdatesThis summary is reviewed regularly and updated as necessary by the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Board members review recently published articles each month to determine whether an article should:be discussed at a meeting,be cited with text, orreplace or update an existing article that is already cited.Changes to the summaries are

  6. To Learn More About Pancreatic Cancer

    For more information from the National Cancer Institute about pancreatic cancer, see the following:Pancreatic Cancer Home PageWhat You Need to Know About™ Cancer of the PancreasUnusual Cancers of ChildhoodDrugs Approved for Pancreatic CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: Targeted Therapies (Advances in Targeted Therapies)Targeted Cancer TherapiesFor general cancer information and other resources from the National Cancer Institute, see the following:What You Need to Know About™ CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: CancerCancer StagingChemotherapy and You: Support for People With CancerRadiation Therapy and You: Support for People With CancerCoping with Cancer: Supportive and Palliative CareQuestions to Ask Your Doctor About CancerCancer LibraryInformation For Survivors/Caregivers/Advocates

  7. About This PDQ Summary

    About PDQPhysician Data Query (PDQ) is the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) comprehensive cancer information database. The PDQ database contains summaries of the latest published information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come in two versions. The health professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to-understand, nontechnical language. Both versions have cancer information that is accurate and up to date and most versions are also available in Spanish.PDQ is a service of the NCI. The NCI is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIH is the federal government's center of biomedical research. The PDQ summaries are based on an independent review of the medical literature. They are not policy statements of the NCI or the NIH.Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary has current

  8. Glucagonoma

    As with the other pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, the mainstay of therapy is surgical resection, and extended survival is possible even when the disease is metastatic. Resection of metastases is also a consideration when feasible.[1]Standard treatment options:Single small lesion in head or tail of pancreas:[1,2,3,4]Enucleation, if feasible.Large lesion in the head of the pancreas that is not amenable to enucleation:[1,2,3,4]Pancreaticoduodenectomy.Single large lesion in body/tail:[1,2,3,4]Distal pancreatectomy.Multiple lesions:[1,2,3,4]Enucleation, if feasible.Resect body and tail otherwise.Metastatic disease: lymph nodes or distant sites:[5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12]Resect when possible.Consider radiofrequency or cryosurgical ablation, if not resectable. Unresectable disease:[13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22]Combination chemotherapy.Somatostatin analogue therapy. Necrotizing erythema of glucagonoma may be relieved in 24 hours with somatostatin analogue, with nearly complete disappearance

  9. Treatment Options for Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer

    Treatment of recurrent pancreatic cancer may include the following:Palliative surgery or stent placement to bypass blocked areas in ducts or the small intestine.Palliative radiation therapy to shrink the tumor.Other palliative medical care to reduce symptoms, such as nerve blocks to relieve pain.Chemotherapy.Clinical trials of chemotherapy, new anticancer therapies, or biologic therapy.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with recurrent pancreatic cancer. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.

  10. Stage I and Stage II Pancreatic Cancer Treatment

    Treatment Options for Stages I and II Pancreatic CancerTreatment options for stages I and II pancreatic cancer include the following:Surgery: radical pancreatic resection including:Whipple procedure (pancreaticoduodenal resection).Total pancreatectomy when necessary for adequate margins.Distal pancreatectomy for tumors of the body and tail of the pancreas.[1,2]Postoperative chemoradiation therapy: radical pancreatic resection followed by 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy and radiation therapy.[3,4,5,6,7]Postoperative chemotherapy: radical pancreatic resection followed by chemotherapy (gemcitabine or 5-FU/leucovorin).[8]Surgery Complete resection can yield 5-year survival rates of 18% to 24%, but ultimate control remains poor because of the high incidence of both local and distant tumor recurrence.[9,10,11][Level of evidence: 3iA]Approximately 20% of patients present with pancreatic cancer amenable to local surgical resection, with operative mortality rates of

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