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Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview

There are different types of treatment for patients with adult Hodgkin lymphoma.

Different types of treatment are available for patients with adult Hodgkin lymphoma. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.

Recommended Related to Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Mantle Cell Lymphoma

Mantle cell lymphoma is a cancer of white blood cells, which help your body fight infections. You may hear your doctor refer to your condition as a type of "non-Hodgkin's lymphoma." These are cancers of the lymphocytes, a specific type of white blood cell. Lymphocytes are found in your lymph nodes, the pea-sized glands in your neck, groin, armpits, and other places that are part of your immune system. If you have mantle cell lymphoma, some of your lymphocytes, called "B-cell" lymphocytes,...

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For pregnant women with Hodgkin lymphoma, treatment is carefully chosen to protect the fetus. Treatment decisions are based on the mother's wishes, the stage of the Hodgkin lymphoma, and the age of the fetus. The treatment plan may change as the signs and symptoms, cancer, and pregnancy change. Choosing the most appropriate cancer treatment is a decision that ideally involves the patient, family, and health care team.

Patients with Hodgkin lymphoma should have their treatment planned by a team of health care providers with expertise in treating lymphomas.

Treatment will be overseen by a medical oncologist, a doctor who specializes in treating cancer. The medical oncologist may refer you to other health care providers who have experience and expertise in treating adult Hodgkin lymphoma and who specialize in certain areas of medicine. These may include the following specialists:

  • Neurosurgeon.
  • Neurologist.
  • Rehabilitation specialist.
  • Radiation oncologist.
  • Endocrinologist.
  • Hematologist.
  • Other oncology specialists.

Patients may develop late effects that appear months or years after their treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma.

Treatment with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma may increase the risk of second cancers and other health problems for many months or years after treatment. These late effects depend on the type of treatment and the patient's age when treated, and may include:

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