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Cancer Health Center

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Cancer Support: Managing Stress - Topic Overview


It's great to have family and friends who are good listeners. But not everyone has someone to talk to. And sometimes it's easier to talk to someone who isn't directly affected by your cancer. A counselor or therapist can help you work through the emotions and stress of cancer and simply listen to your worries and anything else you feel like talking about.

Different types of counseling include family therapy, couples therapy, group counseling, and individual counseling. Finding a good fit with a counselor is important. If you make an appointment with a counselor and find that you're not comfortable talking to him or her, it's okay to try someone else.

Talk to your cancer care team about what counseling might be available to you.

If you're struggling

It's okay to feel angry, sad, and frustrated when you're facing cancer. It's okay to grieve. But if these feelings or stress get in the way of your ability to carry on with daily activities and nothing seems to help, talk to your doctor. He or she has other resources that may be just what you need.

Where to learn more

The following booklets from the National Cancer Institute's website may be helpful:

  • Taking Time: Support for People With Cancer (
  • When Someone You Love Is Being Treated for Cancer (

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: November 14, 2014
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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