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Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Essential Thrombocythemia

Essential thrombocythemia is a disease in which too many platelets are made in the bone marrow.

Essential thrombocythemia causes an abnormal increase in the number of platelets made in the blood and bone marrow.

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Patients with essential thrombocythemia may have no symptoms.

Essential thrombocythemia often does not cause early symptoms. It is sometimes found during a routine blood test. The following symptoms may be caused by essential thrombocytopenia or by other conditions. Check with your doctor if you have any of the following problems:

  • Headache.
  • Burning or tingling in the hands or feet.
  • Redness and warmth of the hands or feet.
  • Vision or hearing problems.

Platelets are sticky. When there are too many platelets, they may clump together and make it hard for the blood to flow. Clots may form in blood vessels and there may also be increased bleeding. These can cause serious health problems such as stroke or heart attack.

Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options for essential thrombocythemia.

Prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options depend on the following:

  • The age of the patient.
  • Whether the patient has symptoms or other problems related to essential thrombocythemia.

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    WebMD Public Information from the National Cancer Institute

    Last Updated: September 04, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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