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Endometrial (Uterine) Cancer - Prevention

You cannot control some things that put you at risk for endometrial cancer, such as a family history of endometrial or colon cancer.

But you can make personal choices that lower your risk of endometrial cancer.

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  • Strive for a healthy body weight. The body's fat cells make estrogen. For more information on controlling your weight, see the topic Weight Management.
  • Breast-feed if you are able. This decreases ovulation and estrogen activity.
  • Get treatment for abnormal or unexpected bleeding. (Endometrial hyperplasia, which may develop into endometrial cancer, is one cause of abnormal bleeding.) Heavy menstrual periods, bleeding between periods, and bleeding after menopause are symptoms of hyperplasia.
  • Exercise regularly. It may help control your weight and may reduce estrogen levels.
  • Eat a diet that is low in animal fats and high in fruits and vegetables.

You have no risk for endometrial cancer if you have had your uterus removed (hysterectomy).

If you take tamoxifen

Tamoxifen is a breast cancer treatment that lowers your risk for having breast cancer come back (recur). But taking tamoxifen can raise your risk of getting endometrial cancer.

If you are taking tamoxifen, keep taking it as directed by your doctor. But be sure to have a pelvic exam each year. The risk of endometrial cancer from tamoxifen is less than the risk of getting breast cancer again.

If you are worried about endometrial cancer risk, talk with your doctor. You might be able to use another medicine, instead of tamoxifen, to reduce your risk for recurrent breast cancer.

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: May 08, 2013
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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