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    Endometrial (Uterine) Cancer - Treatment Overview

    Sexual problems and body changes continued...

    Having cancer treatments such as radiation therapy or a hysterectomy may affect your ability to have or enjoy sex. If you do have sexual problems, talk with your doctor about treatment, information, or a group for support.

    If you have not yet reached menopause, your menstrual period will end immediately after most treatments for endometrial cancer. If your uterus and ovaries have been removed or have had radiation therapy, your body will have a decrease in estrogen. This may cause:

    • Menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes, changes in mood, vaginal dryness, and atrophy (shrinking) of pelvic tissues. Talk with your doctor about how to manage your symptoms if they bother you. To learn more, see the topic Menopause and Perimenopause.
    • An increased risk of heart disease and changes in your bones, such as osteoporosis.

    Palliative care

    Palliative care is a kind of care for people who have a serious illness. It's different from care to cure your illness. Its goal is to improve your quality of life-not just in your body but also in your mind and spirit. You can have this care along with treatment to cure your illness.

    Palliative care providers will work to help control pain or side effects. They may help you decide what treatment you want or don't want. And they can help your loved ones understand how to support you.

    If you're interested in palliative care, talk to your doctor.

    For more information, see the topic Palliative Care.

    End-of-life care

    For some people who have advanced cancer, a time comes when treatment to cure the cancer no longer seems like a good choice. This can be because the side effects, time, and costs of treatment are greater than the promise of cure or relief. But you can still get treatment to make you as comfortable as possible during the time you have left. You and your doctor can decide when you may be ready for hospice care.

    For more information, see the topics:

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: November 14, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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