Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Cancer Health Center

Font Size

Endometrial (Uterine) Cancer - What Increases Your Risk

A risk factor for endometrial cancer is something that increases your chance of getting it. But it doesn't mean that you will definitely get it. And many people who get endometrial cancer don't have any risk factors.

The biggest risk factor for most endometrial cancers is related to the hormone estrogen. Estrogen is not a risk factor for endometrial cancer when it is balanced with another hormone, progesterone. But when estrogen is not kept in balance with progesterone, it can cause problems that raise a woman's risk for this cancer.

Recommended Related to Cancer

General Information About Plasma Cell Neoplasms

There are several types of plasma cell neoplasms. These diseases are all associated with a monoclonal (or myeloma) protein (M protein). They include monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), isolated plasmacytoma of the bone, extramedullary plasmacytoma, and multiple myeloma. Incidence and Mortality Estimated new cases and deaths from multiple myeloma in the United States in 2012:[1] New cases: 21,700. Deaths: 10,710. Clinical Presentation and Evaluation

Read the General Information About Plasma Cell Neoplasms article > >

Risk factors for endometrial cancer include:

  • Being obese. Fat cells make extra estrogen, but the body doesn't make extra progesterone to balance it out.
  • Taking estrogen without taking a progestin.
  • Taking tamoxifen. Tamoxifen reduces your risk for breast cancer but can increase your risk for endometrial cancer.
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome. This can cause you to produce too much estrogen and not enough progesterone.
  • Having naturally high levels of estrogen. This can cause women to start their periods before age 12 and delay menopause until after they are 52.

Other things that increase your risk include:

  • Being older than 50. Endometrial cancer is most common in women older than 50.
  • Inheriting some kinds of genes, such as those for Lynch syndrome.
  • Having endometrial hyperplasia.
  • Having type 2 diabetes.
  • Never having been pregnant.
  • Having previous radiation therapy to the pelvis.
1

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: May 08, 2013
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
Next Article:

Today on WebMD

Building a Support System
Blog
cancer fighting foods
SLIDESHOW
 
precancerous lesions slideshow
SLIDESHOW
quit smoking tips
SLIDESHOW
 
Jennifer Goodman Linn self-portrait
Blog
what is your cancer risk
HEALTH CHECK
 
colorectal cancer treatment advances
Video
breast cancer overview slideshow
SLIDESHOW
 
prostate cancer overview
SLIDESHOW
lung cancer overview slideshow
SLIDESHOW
 
ovarian cancer overview slideshow
SLIDESHOW
Actor Michael Douglas
Article