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Family Caregivers in Cancer (PDQ®): Supportive care - Patient Information [NCI] - The Caregiver's Quality of Life

Caring for a patient with cancer affects the family caregiver's quality of life.

Family caregivers usually begin caregiving without training and are expected to meet many demands without much help. A caregiver often neglects his or her own quality of life by putting the patient's needs first. Today, many health care providers watch for signs of caregiver distress during the course of the patient's cancer treatment. When caregiver strain affects the quality of caregiving, the patient's well-being is also affected. Helping the caregiver also helps the patient.

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Caregiving can affect the caregiver's quality of life in many areas.

The caregiver's well-being is affected in many areas. These include psychological, physical, social, financial, and spiritual.

Psychological Issues

Psychological distress is the most common effect of caregiving on the caregiver's quality of life. Caring for a cancer patient is a difficult and stressful job. Caregiver distress comes from the practical demands of the caregiver role as well the emotional ones, such as seeing the patient suffer. Family members seeing a loved one with cancer may feel as much or more distress than the patient does. Distress is usually worse when the cancer is advanced and the patient is no longer being treated to cure the cancer.

Caregivers who have health problems of their own or demands from other parts of their lives may enter the caregiving role already overwhelmed. For an older adult caregiver, problems that are a part of aging may make caregiving harder to handle.

The caregiver's ability to cope with distress may be affected by his or her personality type. Someone who is usually hopeful and positive may cope better with problems of caregiving.

Physical Issues

Cancer patients often need a lot of physical help during their illness. This is physically demanding for the caregiver, who may need to help the patient with many activities during the day such as:

  • Use the toilet.
  • Eat.
  • Change position in bed.
  • Move from one place to another, such as from bed to toilet.
  • Use medical equipment.

The amount of physical help a patient needs depends on the following:

  • Whether the patient can do normal activities of daily living, like dressing and walking.
  • The amount of fatigue the patient has.
  • The stage of the cancer.
  • The symptoms and how bad they are.
  • Side effects of the cancer and the cancer treatments.
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