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    Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (PDQ®): Genetics - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Colon Cancer Genes

    Table 2. Genes Associated with a High Susceptibility of Colorectal Cancer continued...

    De Novo Mutation Rate

    Until the 1990s, the diagnosis of genetically inherited polyposis syndromes was based on clinical manifestations and family history. Now that some of the genes involved in these syndromes have been identified, a few studies have attempted to estimate the spontaneous mutation rate (de novo mutation rate) in these populations. Interestingly, FAP, JPS, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Cowden syndrome, and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome are all thought to have high rates of spontaneous mutations, in the 25% to 30% range,[3,4,5] while estimates of de novo mutations in the MMR genes associated with LS are thought to be low, in the 0.9% to 5% range.[6,7,8] These estimates of spontaneous mutation rates in LS seem to overlap with the estimates of nonpaternity rates in various populations (0.6% to 3.3%),[9,10,11] making the de novo mutation rate for LS seem quite low in contrast to the relatively high rates in the other polyposis syndromes.

    Genetic Polymorphisms and CRC Risk

    It is widely acknowledged that the familial clustering of colon cancer also occurs outside of the setting of well-characterized colon cancer family syndromes.[12] Based on epidemiological studies, the risk of colon cancer in a first-degree relative of an affected individual can increase an individual's lifetime risk of colon cancer 2-fold to 4.3-fold.[13] The relative risk (RR) and absolute risk of CRC for different family history categories is estimated in Table 1. In addition, the lifetime risk of colon cancer also increases in first-degree relatives of individuals with colon adenomas.[14] The magnitude of risk depends on the age at diagnosis of the index case, the degree of relatedness of the index case to the at-risk case, and the number of affected relatives. It is currently believed that many of the moderate- and low-risk cases are influenced by low-penetrance genes or gene combinations. Given the public health impact of identifying the etiology of this increased risk, an intense search for the responsible genes is under way.

    Each locus would be expected to have a relatively small effect on CRC risk and would not produce the dramatic familial aggregation seen in LS or FAP. However, in combination with other common genetic loci and/or environmental factors, variants of this kind might significantly alter CRC risk. These types of genetic variations are often referred to as polymorphisms. Most loci that are polymorphic have no influence on disease risk or human traits (benign polymorphisms), while those that are associated with a difference in risk of disease or a human trait (however subtle) are sometimes termed disease-associated polymorphisms or functionally relevant polymorphisms. When such variation involves changes in single nucleotides of DNA they are referred to as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs).

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