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Late Effects of Treatment for Childhood Cancer (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (05 / 23 / 2013)

The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.

Late Effects of the Cardiovascular System

Recommended Related to Cancer

Potential Roles for the Family Caregiver

Caregivers of cancer patients are expected to function broadly, providing direct care, assistance with activities of daily living, case management, emotional support, companionship, and medication supervision.[1] Caregivers of cancer patients generally undertake multifaceted responsibilities for tasks such as the following:[2] Administrative tasks (case management, management of insurance claims, bill payment). Instrumental tasks (accompanying the cancer patient to medical appointments; running...

Read the Potential Roles for the Family Caregiver article > >

Added text about how emerging evidence suggests that genetic factors may explain the heterogeneity in susceptibility to anthracycline-related cardiac injury, and further study of genetic risk profiling of anthracycline injury is needed to integrate pharmacogenetic data into clinical practice (cited Visscher et al. and Davies as references 26 and 27, respectively).

The Prevalence, Clinical Manifestations, and Risk Factors for Cardiac Toxicity subsection was extensively revised.

Added Campen et al. as reference 66.

Late Effects of the Endocrine System

Added text to state that Childhood Cancer Survivor Study investigators performed a nested case-control study to evaluate the magnitude of risk for thyroid cancer over the therapeutic radiation dose range of pediatric cancers; the risk of thyroid cancer increased with radiation doses up to 20 to 29 Gy, but declined at doses greater than 30 Gy, consistent with a cell-killing effect.

Added text to state that longitudinal decline in body mass index related to substantial decrease in lean mass has been observed among survivors of hematological malignancies treated with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; this finding was largely attributable to total-body irradiation conditioning and severity of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cited Inaba et al. as reference 102).

This summary is written and maintained by the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of NCI. The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or NIH. More information about summary policies and the role of the PDQ Editorial Boards in maintaining the PDQ summaries can be found on the About This PDQ Summary and PDQ NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database pages.

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    WebMD Public Information from the National Cancer Institute

    Last Updated: September 04, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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