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Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Atypical Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

Atypical chronic myelogenous leukemia is a disease in which too many granulocytes (immature white blood cells) are made in the bone marrow.

In atypical chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), the body tells too many blood stem cells to become a type of white blood cell called granulocytes. Some of these blood stem cells never become mature white blood cells. These immature white blood cells are called blasts. Over time, the granulocytes and blasts crowd out the red blood cells and platelets in the bone marrow.

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The leukemia cells in atypical CML and CML look alike under a microscope. However, in atypical CML a certain chromosome change, called the "Philadelphia chromosome" is not there.

Signs and symptoms of atypical chronic myelogenous leukemia include easy bruising or bleeding and feeling tired and weak.

These and other signs and symptoms may be caused by atypical CML or by other conditions. Check with your doctor if you have any of the following:

  • Shortness of breath.
  • Pale skin.
  • Feeling very tired and weak.
  • Easy bruising or bleeding.
  • Petechiae (flat, pinpoint spots under the skin caused by bleeding).
  • Pain or a feeling of fullness below the ribs on the left side.

Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery).

The prognosis (chance of recovery) for atypical CML depends on the number of red blood cells and platelets in the blood.

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    WebMD Public Information from the National Cancer Institute

    Last Updated: May 28, 2015
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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