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Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Myelodysplastic / Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

Myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm, unclassifiable, is a disease that has features of both myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative diseases but is not chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, or atypical chronic myelogenous leukemia.

In myelodysplastic /myeloproliferative neoplasm, unclassifiable (MDS/MPD-UC), the body tells too many blood stem cells to become red blood cells, white blood cells, or platelets. Some of these blood stem cells never become mature blood cells. These immature blood cells are called blasts. Over time, the abnormal blood cells and blasts in the bone marrow crowd out the healthy red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.

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MDS/MPN-UC is a very rare disease. Because it is so rare, the factors that affect risk and prognosis are not known.

Possible signs of myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm, unclassifiable, include fever, feeling very tired, and weight loss.

These and other symptoms may be caused by MDS/MPN-UC. Other conditions may cause the same symptoms. Check with your doctor if you have any of the following problems:

  • Fever or frequent infections.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Feeling very tired and weak.
  • Pale skin.
  • Easy bruising or bleeding.
  • Petechiae (flat, pinpoint spots under the skin caused by bleeding).
  • Pain or a feeling of fullness below the ribs.
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WebMD Public Information from the National Cancer Institute

Last Updated: February 25, 2014
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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