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Nausea and Vomiting (PDQ®): Supportive care - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Overview

Table 1. National Cancer Institute's Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events: N&Va

Adverse EventGradeDescription
N&V = nausea and vomiting (emesis); TPN = total parenteral nutrition.
a Adapted from National Cancer Institute.[10]
b Definition: A disorder characterized by a queasy sensation and/or the urge to vomit.
c Definition: A disorder characterized by the reflexive act of ejecting the contents of the stomach through the mouth.
Nauseab1Loss of appetite without alteration in eating habits
2Oral intake decreased without significant weight loss, dehydration, or malnutrition
3Inadequate oral caloric or fluid intake; tube feeding, TPN, or hospitalization indicated
4Grade not available
5Grade not available
Vomitingc11–2 episodes (separated by 5 min) in 24 h
23–5 episodes (separated by 5 min) in 24 h
3≥6 episodes (separated by 5 min) in 24 h; tube feeding, TPN, or hospitalization indicated
4Life-threatening consequences; urgent intervention indicated
5Death

References:

  1. Wickham R: Nausea and vomiting. In: Yarbo CH, Frogge MH, Goodman M, eds.: Cancer Symptom Management. 2nd ed. Sudbury, Mass: Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 1999, pp 228-263.
  2. Coates A, Abraham S, Kaye SB, et al.: On the receiving end--patient perception of the side-effects of cancer chemotherapy. Eur J Cancer Clin Oncol 19 (2): 203-8, 1983.
  3. Craig JB, Powell BL: The management of nausea and vomiting in clinical oncology. Am J Med Sci 293 (1): 34-44, 1987.
  4. Passik SD, Kirsh KL, Rosenfeld B, et al.: The changeable nature of patients' fears regarding chemotherapy: implications for palliative care. J Pain Symptom Manage 21 (2): 113-20, 2001.
  5. Grunberg SM, Deuson RR, Mavros P, et al.: Incidence of chemotherapy-induced nausea and emesis after modern antiemetics. Cancer 100 (10): 2261-8, 2004.
  6. Pisters KM, Kris MG: Treatment-related nausea and vomiting. In: Berger A, Portenoy RK, Weissman DE, eds.: Principles and Practice of Supportive Oncology. Philadelphia, Pa: Lippincott-Raven Publishers, 1998, pp 165-199.
  7. Fallon BG: Nausea and vomiting unrelated to cancer treatment. In: Berger A, Portenoy RK, Weissman DE, eds.: Principles and Practice of Supportive Oncology. Philadelphia, Pa: Lippincott-Raven Publishers, 1998, pp 179-189.
  8. Allan SG: Nausea and vomiting. In: Doyle D, Hanks GW, MacDonald N, eds.: Oxford Textbook of Palliative Medicine. 2nd ed. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 1998, pp 282-290.
  9. Schwartzberg L: Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: state of the art in 2006. J Support Oncol 4 (2 Suppl 1): 3-8, 2006.
  10. National Cancer Institute.: Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), Version 4.0. Bethesda, Md: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, 2010. Available online. Last accessed March 28, 2013.
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WebMD Public Information from the National Cancer Institute

Last Updated: February 25, 2014
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