Skip to content

Cancer Health Center

Font Size

Cellular Classification of Testicular Cancer

    The following histologic classification of malignant testicular germ cell tumors (testicular cancer) reflects the classification used by the World Health Organization (WHO).[1] Less than 50% of malignant testicular germ cell tumors have a single cell type, of which roughly 50% are seminomas. The rest have more than one cell type, and the relative proportions of each cell type should be specified. The cell type of these tumors is important for estimating the risk of metastases and the response to chemotherapy. Polyembryoma presents an unusual growth pattern and is sometimes listed as a single histologic type, though it might better be regarded as a mixed tumor.[1,2,3]

    1. Intratubular germ cell neoplasia, unclassified.
    2. Malignant pure germ cell tumor (showing a single cell type):
      1. Seminoma.
      2. Embryonal carcinoma.
      3. Teratoma.
      4. Choriocarcinoma.
      5. Yolk sac tumor.
    3. Malignant mixed germ cell tumor (showing more than one histologic pattern):
      1. Embryonal carcinoma and teratoma with or without seminoma.
      2. Embryonal carcinoma and yolk sac tumor with or without seminoma.
      3. Embryonal carcinoma and seminoma.
      4. Yolk sac tumor and teratoma with or without seminoma.
      5. Choriocarcinoma and any other element.
    4. Polyembryoma.

    References:

    Recommended Related to Cancer

    History

    Cannabis use for medicinal purposes dates back at least 3,000 years.[1,2,3,4,5] It was introduced into Western medicine in the 1840s by W.B. O'Shaughnessy, a surgeon who learned of its medicinal properties while working in India for the British East Indies Company. Its use was promoted for reported analgesic, sedative, anti-inflammatory, antispasmodic, and anticonvulsant effects. In 1937, the U.S. Treasury Department introduced the Marihuana Tax Act. This Act imposed a levy of one dollar an...

    Read the History article > >

    1. Woodward PJ, Heidenreich A, Looijenga LHJ, et al.: Germ cell tumours. In: Eble JN, Sauter G, Epstein JI, et al.: Pathology and Genetics of Tumours of the Urinary System and Male Genital Organs. Lyon, France: IARC Press, 2004, pp 221-49.
    2. Ulbright TM, Berney DM: Testicular and paratesticular tumors. In: Mills SE, Carter D, Greenson JK, et al., eds.: Sternberg's Diagnostic Surgical Pathology. Philadelphia, Pa: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2010, pp 1944-2004.
    3. Bosi GJ, Feldman DR, Bajorin DE, et al.: Cancer of the testis. In: DeVita VT Jr, Lawrence TS, Rosenberg SA: Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology. 9th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011, pp 1280-1301.

      WebMD Public Information from the National Cancer Institute

      Last Updated: February 25, 2014
      This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
      1

      Today on WebMD

      Colorectal cancer cells
      A common one in both men and women.
      Lung cancer xray
      See it in pictures, plus read the facts.
       
      sauteed cherry tomatoes
      Fight cancer one plate at a time.
      Ovarian cancer illustration
      Do you know the symptoms?
       
      Jennifer Goodman Linn self-portrait
      Blog
      what is your cancer risk
      HEALTH CHECK
       
      colorectal cancer treatment advances
      Video
      breast cancer overview slideshow
      SLIDESHOW
       
      prostate cancer overview
      SLIDESHOW
      lung cancer overview slideshow
      SLIDESHOW
       
      ovarian cancer overview slideshow
      SLIDESHOW
      Actor Michael Douglas
      Article