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Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - General Information About Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer

Liver cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the liver.

The liver is one of the largest organs in the body. It has four lobes and fills the upper right side of the abdomen inside the rib cage. The liver has many important functions, including:

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Call 1-800-4-CANCER For more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions. Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The...

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  • Filtering harmful substances from the blood so they can be passed from the body in stools and urine.
  • Making bile to help digest fats from food.
  • Storing glycogen (sugar), which the body uses for energy.

See the following PDQ summaries for more information about liver (hepatocellular) cancer:

  • Liver (Hepatocellular) Cancer Prevention
  • Adult Primary Liver Cancer Treatment
  • Childhood Liver Cancer Treatment

Liver cancer is less common in the United States than in other parts of the world.

Liver cancer is uncommon in the United States, but is the fourth most common cancer in the world. In the United States, men, especially Chinese American men, have a greater risk of developing liver cancer.

Having hepatitis or cirrhosis can increase the risk of developing liver cancer.

Anything that increases the chance of getting a disease is called a risk factor. Having a risk factor does not mean that you will get cancer; not having risk factors doesn't mean that you will not get cancer. People who think they may be at risk should discuss this with their doctor. Risk factors for liver cancer include:

  • Having hepatitis B or hepatitis C; having both hepatitis B and hepatitis C increases the risk even more.
  • Having a close relative with both hepatitis and liver cancer.
  • Having cirrhosis , which can be caused by:
    • Hepatitis (especially hepatitis C).
    • Drinking large amounts of alcohol for many years or being an alcoholic.
  • Eating foods tainted with aflatoxin (poison from a fungus than can grow on foods, such as grains and nuts, that have not been stored properly).
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WebMD Public Information from the National Cancer Institute

Last Updated: February 25, 2014
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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