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Pediatric Supportive Care (PDQ®): Supportive care - Health Professional Information [NCI] - End of Life

Despite significant improvements in long-term, disease-free survival in children treated for cancer,[1] cancer is the leading disease-related cause of death for children in the United States.[2] For more than half of children for whom frontline treatment fails, treatment using relapse and disease recurrence clinical trials (phase I and phase II) and unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is common.[3] For children, this strategy is sometimes effective in providing prolonged remissions with patient-valued quality of life.[4] For these reasons, many children treated for cancer in the United States and around the world die in inpatient settings while receiving active cancer treatment.[5] Clinical practice and experience is the driving force in this field; unfortunately, very few empirical studies have been published to guide practice.

Considering End-of-Life Issues

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General Information About Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

Incidence and Mortality Estimated new cases and deaths from soft tissue sarcoma in the United States in 2013:[1] New cases: 11,410. Deaths: 4,390. Soft tissue sarcomas are malignant tumors that arise in any of the mesodermal tissues of the extremities (50%), trunk and retroperitoneum (40%), or head and neck (10%). The reported international incidence rates range from 1.8 to 5 per 100,000 per year.[2] Risk Factors and Genetic Factors The risk of sporadic soft tissue sarcomas...

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Planning for a child's death is often a very uncomfortable topic for parents, other family members, and members of the health care team. Children are not supposed to die. Although there has been a significant emphasis on better understanding the decision-making process and the care provided for children at the end of life,[6] many parents choose to continue active cancer treatment until death.

One hundred forty-one parents who had lost a child to cancer were asked whether their children benefited or suffered from treatment with no realistic expectation of success. Thirty-eight percent of the parents indicated that their children continued to receive cancer-directed therapy, even after the parents recognized that there was no realistic chance of success. Sixty-one percent of these reported that their child experienced some suffering, and 57% reported little or no benefit from the continued treatment. Despite these experiences, 57% reported that they would recommend standard chemotherapy during the end-of-life phase, and 33% would recommend experimental (phase I and phase II) treatment. Parents who felt that their child suffered at the end of life were less likely to recommend additional chemotherapy. However, even those who did not personally support using standard chemotherapy at the end of life (91%) felt that physicians should offer this as an option.[7]

Parent and physician perspectives on quality of care at the end of life do not always match. Parents of children who died from cancer reported focusing primarily on relationship issues, with higher ratings for physician care when oncologists:[8]

  • Provided clear information.
  • Communicated with care and sensitivity.
  • Communicated directly with the child when appropriate.
  • Prepared parents for the circumstances around the child's impending death.

Oncologists based care ratings on biomedical measures such as lower ratings of pain by parents and fewer days of hospitalization.

Support for End-of-Life Care

Resources to support palliative care and end-of-life care for children treated for cancer are often quite limited. A survey of member institutions of the Children's Oncology Group (81% response rate) found that only 58% had a pediatric palliative care team available to families,[9] although the following related services were available:

  • Pain service, 90%.
  • Hospice, 60%.
  • Psychosocial support team, 80%.
  • Bereavement program, 59%.
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WebMD Public Information from the National Cancer Institute

Last Updated: February 25, 2014
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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