Find Information About:

Drugs & Supplements

Get information and reviews on prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and supplements. Search by name or medical condition.

Pill Identifier

Pill Identifier

Having trouble identifying your pills?

Enter the shape, color, or imprint of your prescription or OTC drug. Our pill identification tool will display pictures that you can compare to your pill.

Get Started

My Medicine

Save your medicine, check interactions, sign up for FDA alerts, create family profiles and more.

Get Started

WebMD Health Experts and Community

Talk to health experts and other people like you in WebMD's Communities. It's a safe forum where you can create or participate in support groups and discussions about health topics that interest you.

  • Second Opinion

    Second Opinion

    Read expert perspectives on popular health topics.

  • Community


    Connect with people like you, and get expert guidance on living a healthy life.

Got a health question? Get answers provided by leading organizations, doctors, and experts.

Get Answers

Sign up to receive WebMD's award-winning content delivered to your inbox.

Sign Up

Cancer Health Center

Font Size

Nutrition in Cancer Care (PDQ®): Supportive care - Patient Information [NCI] - Effects of Cancer Treatment on Nutrition

Surgery and Nutrition

Surgery increases the body's need for nutrients and energy.

Recommended Related to Cancer


This complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) information summary provides an overview of the use of Cannabis and its components as a treatment for people with cancer -related symptoms caused by the disease itself or its treatment. This summary contains the following key information: Cannabis has been used for medicinal purposes for thousands of years. By federal law, the possession of Cannabis, also known as marijuana, is illegal in the United States; however, a growing number of states...

Read the Overview article > >

The body needs extra energy and nutrients to heal wounds, fight infection, and recover from surgery. If the patient is malnourished before surgery, it may cause problems during recovery, such as poor healing or infection. For these patients, nutrition care may begin before surgery.

Surgery to the head, neck, esophagus, stomach, or intestines may affect nutrition.

Most cancer patients are treated with surgery. Surgery that removes all or part of certain organs can affect a patient's ability to eat and digest food. The following are nutrition problems caused by specific types of surgery:

  • Surgery to the head and neck may cause problems with:
    • Chewing.
    • Swallowing.
    • Tasting or smelling food.
    • Making saliva.
    • Seeing.
  • Surgery that affects the esophagus, stomach, or intestines may keep these organs from working as they should to digest food and absorb nutrients.

All of these can affect the patient's ability to eat normally. Emotional stress about the surgery itself also may affect appetite.

Nutrition therapy can help relieve nutrition problems caused by surgery.

Nutrition therapy can relieve or decrease the side effects of surgery and help cancer patients get the nutrients they need. Nutrition therapy may include the following:

  • Nutritional supplement drinks.
  • Enteral nutrition (feeding liquid through a tube into the stomach or intestines).
  • Parenteral nutrition (feeding through a catheter into the bloodstream).
  • Medicines to increase appetite.

It is common for patients to have pain, tiredness, and/or loss of appetite after surgery. For a short time, some patients may not be able to eat what they usually do because of these symptoms. Following certain tips about food may help. These include:

  • Stay away from carbonated drinks (such as sodas) and foods that cause gas, such as:
    • Beans.
    • Peas.
    • Broccoli.
    • Cabbage.
    • Brussels sprouts.
    • Green peppers.
    • Radishes.
    • Cucumbers.
  • Increase calories by frying foods and using gravies, mayonnaise, and salad dressings. Supplements high in calories and protein can also be used.
  • Choose high-protein and high-calorie foods to increase energy and help wounds heal. Good choices include:
    • Eggs.
    • Cheese.
    • Whole milk.
    • Ice cream.
    • Nuts.
    • Peanut butter.
    • Meat.
    • Poultry.
    • Fish.
  • If constipation is a problem, increase fiber by small amounts and drink lots of water. Good sources of fiber include:
    • Whole-grain cereals (such as oatmeal and bran).
    • Beans.
    • Vegetables.
    • Fruit.
    • Whole-grain breads.
    See the Constipation section for more information.
    Next Article:

    Today on WebMD

    Colorectal cancer cells
    New! I AM Not Cancer Facebook Group
    Lung cancer xray
    See it in pictures, plus read the facts.
    sauteed cherry tomatoes
    Fight cancer one plate at a time.
    Ovarian cancer illustration
    Real Cancer Perspectives
    Jennifer Goodman Linn self-portrait
    what is your cancer risk
    colorectal cancer treatment advances
    breast cancer overview slideshow
    prostate cancer overview
    lung cancer overview slideshow
    ovarian cancer overview slideshow
    Actor Michael Douglas