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Salivary Gland Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Recurrent Major Salivary Gland Cancer

The prognosis for any treated cancer patient with progressing or relapsing disease is poor, regardless of cell type or stage. Selecting further treatment depends on many factors, including the specific cancer, prior treatment, site of recurrence, and individual patient considerations. Fast neutron-beam radiation therapy is superior to conventional radiation therapy using x-rays and may be curative in selected patients with recurrent disease.[1]

Disease-free survival and overall survival for patients with inoperable, unresectable, or recurrent malignant salivary gland tumors is superior in patients treated with fast neutron-beam radiation therapy as compared to those treated with conventional x-ray radiation therapy.[2,3,4,5] Clinical trials are appropriate and should be considered when possible.

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Current Clinical Trials

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with recurrent salivary gland cancer. The list of clinical trials can be further narrowed by location, drug, intervention, and other criteria.

General information about clinical trials is also available from the NCI Web site.

References:

  1. Laramore GE, Krall JM, Griffin TW, et al.: Neutron versus photon irradiation for unresectable salivary gland tumors: final report of an RTOG-MRC randomized clinical trial. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Medical Research Council. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 27 (2): 235-40, 1993.
  2. Laramore GE: Fast neutron radiotherapy for inoperable salivary gland tumors: is it the treatment of choice? Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 13 (9): 1421-3, 1987.
  3. Saroja KR, Mansell J, Hendrickson FR, et al.: An update on malignant salivary gland tumors treated with neutrons at Fermilab. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 13 (9): 1319-25, 1987.
  4. Buchholz TA, Laramore GE, Griffin BR, et al.: The role of fast neutron radiation therapy in the management of advanced salivary gland malignant neoplasms. Cancer 69 (11): 2779-88, 1992.
  5. Krüll A, Schwarz R, Engenhart R, et al.: European results in neutron therapy of malignant salivary gland tumors. Bull Cancer Radiother 83 (Suppl): 125-9s, 1996.

    WebMD Public Information from the National Cancer Institute

    Last Updated: September 04, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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