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    Sexuality and Reproductive Issues (PDQ®): Supportive care - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment of Sexual Problems in Cancer Patients

    Good communication can help you and your partner continue sex after cancer treatment.

    You may be afraid or anxious about having sex after cancer treatment. Fear and anxiety can cause you to avoid intimacy, touch, and sexual activity. Your partner may also be afraid and anxious that starting sexual activity will make you feel pressured or cause you pain. Even when a couple has been together a long time, talking about these things is important. Honest communication of feelings, concerns, and preferences can help.

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    You can learn ways to adapt to changes in sexual function.

    Health professionals who specialize in treating sexual problems can give you the names of organizations that offer support. They can also tell you about educational materials such as Internet sources, books, pamphlets, and DVDs. These resources can help you learn ways to adapt to changes in sexual function.

    Counseling may make it easier for you to cope with changes in your body and your sex life after cancer.

    Sexual counseling may help you. Counseling may be for you alone, with you and your partner, or in a group.

    Medical treatments may help improve sexual function.

    You may be helped by medical treatments such as hormone replacement, drugs, medical devices, or surgery.

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    WebMD Public Information from the National Cancer Institute

    Last Updated: May 28, 2015
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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