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Cancer Health Center

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Testicular Cancer Screening - Topic Overview

Testicular cancer is not common. It is often first discovered by the man himself, or his sex partner, as a lump or an enlarged and swollen testicle. In the early stages of testicular cancer, the lump, which may be about the size of a pea, usually is not painful. Testicular cancer has a high cure rate.

Experts have different recommendations for screening for testicular cancer. For example, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force advises against routine testicular exam or testicular self-exams in teens and men who have no symptoms.1 The USPSTF says that the evidence shows that these exams have only a small benefit (if any) and may cause harm from false-positive results that lead to having diagnostic tests or procedures you don't need.

Recommended Related to Cancer

General Information About Vulvar Cancer

Incidence and Mortality Vulvar cancer accounts for about 5% of cancers of the female genital system in the United States. Estimated new cases and deaths from vulvar cancer in the United States in 2014:[1] New cases: 4,850. Deaths: 1,030. The vulva is the area immediately external to the vagina, including the mons pubis, labia, clitoris, Bartholin glands, and perineum. The labia majora are the most common site of vulvar carcinoma involvement and account for about 50% of cases...

Read the General Information About Vulvar Cancer article > >

Testicular self-examination (TSE) may detect testicular cancer at an early stage. Many doctors do not believe that monthly TSE is needed for men who are at average risk for testicular cancer. Monthly TSE may be recommended for men who are at high risk for testicular cancer. This includes men with a history of an undescended testicle or a family or personal history of testicular cancer.

For more information, see the topic Testicular Cancer.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: November 14, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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