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Tips for Teaching Kids With ADHD

    Simple classroom adjustments make it easier for a teacher to work with the strengths and weaknesses of a child with ADHD.

    It may be helpful for teachers to:

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    • Pair written instructions with oral instructions.
    • Give clear, concise instructions.
    • Ask a volunteer in the class to repeat the directions.
    • Use a timer to help with transitions and organizations.
    • Speak when the child is paying attention.
    • Set up clear rules of behavior and consequences for breaking these rules.
    • Set up a program that rewards appropriate behavior.
    • Seat the child near a good role model or near the teacher.
    • Establish a nonverbal cue to get the child’s attention.
    • Establish a routine so the child knows what to expect (this may be a daily agenda or checklist that can be posted visibly in the classroom).

     

     

     

    WebMD Medical Reference

    Reviewed by Renee A. Alli, MD on September 23, 2014
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