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    What Is Benign Hypermobility Joint Syndrome?

    Treatment

    Simple things can help with this condition, such as:

    Exercise. It’s a good idea to strengthen the muscles around loose joints. For some people, doctors recommend splints, braces, or taping to protect affected joints during activity.

    • Joint protection. These tips will help your child avoid overstretching their hypermobile joints:
      • Don’t sit cross-legged with both knees bent ("Indian style").
      • Bend the knees slightly when standing.
      • Wear shoes with good arch supports.
      • Stop any unusual joint movements that hypermobile children often use to entertain their friends.

    Medications don’t fix loose joints. If pain after exercise is a problem, ask your doctor about over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drugs, such as naproxen or ibuprofen.

    Outlook for People With the Condition

    Children with loose joints often do well in activities that reward flexibility, such as cheerleading, modern dance, gymnastics, and ballet. (Those activities also require strength, of course.)

    But they may need to stop or cut back on some of these hobbies if they are too painful or if your child dislocates a joint.

    Most symptoms improve as children get older and stronger. Still, it lasts for some people.

    The syndrome rarely leads to arthritis later in life. But some people with the condition may get shoulder or kneecap problems if they often dislocate those joints or if their cartilage gets worn down.

    People who have the syndrome as adults are more likely to get osteoarthritis  (“wear and tear" arthritis) as they age. A few people still have muscle pain from hypermobility as they become adults. They are more likely than others to have sprains, injuries, dislocations, occasional swelling, backaches, and discomfort after exercise.

    WebMD Medical Reference

    Reviewed by David Zelman, MD on October 17, 2014
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