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    Carpenter Syndrome

    Important
    It is possible that the main title of the report Carpenter Syndrome is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report.

    Synonyms

    • ACPS II
    • acrocephalopolysyndactyly type II

    Disorder Subdivisions

    • None

    General Discussion

    Carpenter syndrome belongs to a group of rare genetic disorders known as "acrocephalopolysyndactyly" (ACPS) disorders. All forms of ACPS are characterized by premature closure of the fibrous joints (cranial sutures) between certain bones of the skull (craniosynostosis), causing the top of the head to appear pointed (acrocephaly); webbing or fusion (syndactyly) of certain fingers or toes (digits); and/or more than the normal number of digits (polydactyly). Carpenter syndrome is also known as ACPS type II.

    Carpenter syndrome is typically evident at or shortly after birth. Due to craniosynostosis, the top of the head may appear unusually conical (acrocephaly) or the head may seem short and broad (brachycephaly). In addition, the cranial sutures often fuse unevenly, causing the head and face to appear dissimilar from one side to the other (craniofacial asymmetry). Additional malformations of the skull and facial (craniofacial) region may include downslanting eyelid folds (palpebral fissures); a flat nasal bridge; malformed (dysplastic), low-set ears; and a small, underdeveloped (hypoplastic) upper and/or lower jaw (maxilla and/or mandible).

    Individuals with Carpenter syndrome may also have unusually short fingers and toes (brachydactyly); partial fusion of the soft tissues (cutaneous syndactyly) between certain digits; and the presence of extra (supernumerary) toes or, less commonly, additional fingers (polydactyly). In some instances, additional physical abnormalities are present, such as short stature, structural heart malformations (congenital heart defects), mild to moderate obesity, weakening in the abdominal wall near the navel through which the intestine may protrude (umbilical hernia), or failure of the testes to descend into the scrotum (cryptorchidism) in affected males. In addition, many individuals with the disorder are affected by mild to moderate intellectual disability. However, intelligence is normal in some instances. Carpenter syndrome is usually inherited as an autosomal recessive condition.

    Resources

    March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation
    1275 Mamaroneck Avenue
    White Plains, NY 10605
    Tel: (914)997-4488
    Fax: (914)997-4763
    Tel: (888)663-4637
    Email: Askus@marchofdimes.com
    Internet: http://www.marchofdimes.com

    FACES: The National Craniofacial Association
    PO Box 11082
    Chattanooga, TN 37401
    Tel: (423)266-1632
    Fax: (423)267-3124
    Tel: (800)332-2373
    Email: faces@faces-cranio.org
    Internet: http://www.faces-cranio.org

    The Arc
    1825 K Street NW, Suite 1200
    Washington, DC 20006
    Tel: (202)534-3700
    Fax: (202)534-3731
    Tel: (800)433-5255
    TDD: (817)277-0553
    Email: info@thearc.org
    Internet: http://www.thearc.org

    Let's Face It
    University of Michigan, School of Dentistry / Dentistry Library
    1011 N. University
    Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1078
    USA
    Tel: (360)676-7325
    Email: faceit@umich.edu
    Internet: http://www.dent.umich.edu/faceit

    AmeriFace
    P.O. Box 751112
    Limekiln, PA 19535
    USA
    Tel: (702)769-9264
    Fax: (702)341-5351
    Tel: (888)486-1209
    Email: info@ameriface.org
    Internet: http://www.ameriface.org

    Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing
    3417 Volta Place NW
    Washington, DC 20007-2778
    United States
    Tel: (202)337-5220
    Fax: (202)337-8314
    Tel: (866)337-5220
    TDD: (202)337-5221
    Email: info@agbell.org
    Internet: http://www.agbell.org

    American Heart Association
    7272 Greenville Avenue
    Dallas, TX 75231
    Tel: (214)784-7212
    Fax: (214)784-1307
    Tel: (800)242-8721
    Email: Review.personal.info@heart.org
    Internet: http://www.heart.org

    Institute of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery (New York Medical University)
    560 First Avenue
    New York, NY 10016
    USA
    Tel: (212)263-5834
    Fax: (212)263-5400
    Email: leslie.bernstein@med.nyu.edu
    Internet: http://www.surgery.med.nyu.edu/plastic

    NIH/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders
    31 Center Drive, MSC 2320
    Communication Avenue
    Bethesda, MD 20892-3456
    Tel: (301)402-0900
    Fax: (301)907-8830
    Tel: (800)241-1044
    TDD: (800)241-1105
    Email: nidcdinfo@nidcd.nih.gov
    Internet: http://www.nidcd.nih.gov

    Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center
    PO Box 8126
    Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8126
    Tel: (301)251-4925
    Fax: (301)251-4911
    Tel: (888)205-2311
    TDD: (888)205-3223
    Internet: http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/GARD/

    Cleft Lip and Palate Foundation of Smiles
    2044 Michael Ave SW
    Wyoming, MI 49509
    Tel: (616)329-1335
    Email: Rachelmancuso09@comcast.net
    Internet: http://www.cleftsmile.org

    For a Complete Report:

    This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be downloaded free from the NORD website for registered users. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational therapies (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, go to www.rarediseases.org and click on Rare Disease Database under "Rare Disease Information".

    The information provided in this report is not intended for diagnostic purposes. It is provided for informational purposes only. NORD recommends that affected individuals seek the advice or counsel of their own personal physicians.

    It is possible that the title of this topic is not the name you selected. Please check the Synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and Disorder Subdivision(s) covered by this report

    This disease entry is based upon medical information available through the date at the end of the topic. Since NORD's resources are limited, it is not possible to keep every entry in the Rare Disease Database completely current and accurate. Please check with the agencies listed in the Resources section for the most current information about this disorder.

    For additional information and assistance about rare disorders, please contact the National Organization for Rare Disorders at P.O. Box 1968, Danbury, CT 06813-1968; phone (203) 744-0100; web site www.rarediseases.org or email orphan@rarediseases.org

    Last Updated: 11/3/2010
    Copyright 1989, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2010 National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

    WebMD Medical Reference from the National Organization for Rare Disorders

    Last Updated: May 28, 2015
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

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