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    Want to Help Feed America's Hungry Children?

    Here's how to donate money, time, and the power of your voice to help the country's malnourished children get the food they need.
    By
    WebMD Magazine - Feature
    Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

    Scarlett Johansson discovered her passion for feeding the hungry after Hurricane Katrina, when she started working with USA Harvest in New Orleans. Several years later, Stan Curtis, who founded USA Harvest, asked her if she wanted to help promote a new program called Blessings in a Backpack. The idea was to send kids who received subsidized school lunches home for the weekend with backpacks filled with food for them and their families. Johansson leapt at the chance.

    "I think, especially now, a lot of people are struggling financially, and a lot of kids don't know where their next meal is coming from," Johansson says in the November/December 2009 issue of WebMD the Magazine. "They see their parents trying to scrape together money or welfare or food stamps for meals. For parents to have some relief and know their kids are fed for those extra two days of the week makes a huge difference."

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    To honor her work with Blessings in a Backpack, WebMD the Magazine named Johansson a 2009 WebMD Health Hero winner. She and Stan Curtis -- also a WebMD Health Hero winner -- donated WebMD’s $5,000 donation to the program to fund more local programs across the country. "If you already have the spotlight shining on you, it's great to direct that toward a cause you believe in," Johansson tells WebMD the Magazine. "It's nice to be a voice for people who don't have a voice."

    Malnutrition in children is surprisingly common in this country. According to the nonprofit organization Feed the Children, more than 12 million kids live in households that lack sufficient money to buy food. Nationwide, nearly 20 million children receive free or subsidized meals through the National School Lunch Program.

    Do you want to join Johansson and Curtis and help feed hungry children in your neighborhood? Lots of people feel inspired to help the hungry by serving at a soup kitchen over the holidays. While that's well-intentioned, says Joel Berg, author of All You Can Eat: How Hungry Is America?, you can make much more of a difference in other ways.

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