Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Children's Health

Font Size

Report Warns of Toys With Health Risks

Consumer Group Says Dangerous Toys Can Still Be Found on Store Shelves
By
WebMD Health News
Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD

Nov. 24, 2010 -- Though progress has been made in recent years in making playthings for children safer, far too many toys remain on store shelves that pose serious risks to America’s kids, a consumer watchdog group says in a new report.

Some toys contain toxic chemicals and many are choking hazards, according to the report by the U.S. Public Interest Research Group (U.S. PIRG).

“We’ve made a lot of progress, but dangerous toys can still be found among our children’s playthings,” says Liz Hitchcock, U.S. PIRG public health advocate and lead author of the organization’s 25th annual Trouble in Toyland report. “U.S. PIRG’s report and the resources we offer will help consumers identify and avoid the worst threats and keep their children safe this year.”

Toxic Substances in Toys

The report says many toys contain lead or other toxic substances, pointing to six toys as examples as potentially harmful due to chemicals they contain: a stuffed animal, a baby book, a tiara and jewelry set, a baby doll, plastic toy handcuffs, and a toy gun. The toys were sold at major retail and dollar stores. Among major findings in this year’s report:

  • Despite a ban on small parts in toys for kids under age 3, some toys still pose serious choking hazards, including a toy train with a wooden peg that U.S. PIRG says nearly caused the choking death of a child in the Washington, D.C. area.
  • Some toys contained phthalates, considered to be potentially harmful chemicals, including a baby doll that contained concentrations of phthalates up to 300,000 parts per million. Laboratory tests revealed toys containing potentially toxic lead and antimony, even though lead and other metals have been severely restricted in toys.

The U.S. PIRG report says lead has negative health effects on almost every organ and system in the human body, and that antimony is classified as a possible carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer and the European Union. One baby book with antimony was found to contain far more antimony than allowable limits.

Role of Federal Agencies

Hitchcock says the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is doing a good job “but there is still more work to be done, especially when it comes to reducing choking hazards and regulating the tens of thousands of chemicals that may be in the toys our children play with.”

Toy-related injuries sent more than 250,000 children to emergency rooms in 2009, according to the CPSC. Twelve children died in 2009 from toy-related injuries.

Congress passed The Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 in August 2008. This law gives the CPSC an increase in authority and provides new testing standards for toys. Still, U.S. PIRG says in an executive summary to its 2010 report, “there are tens of thousands of toxic chemicals that are still not regulated for the many uses in our children’s lives.”

Today on WebMD

child with red rash on cheeks
What’s that rash?
plate of fruit and veggies
How healthy is your child’s diet?
 
smiling baby
Treating diarrhea, fever and more.
Middle school band practice
Understanding your child’s changing body.
 

worried kid
fitArticle
boy on father's shoulder
Article
 
Child with red rash on cheeks
Slideshow
girl thinking
Article
 

babyapp
New
Child with adhd
Slideshow
 
rl with friends
fitSlideshow
Syringes and graph illustration
Tool
 
6-Week Challenges
Want to know more?
Chill Out and Charge Up Challenge – How to help your tribe de-stress and energize.
Spark Change Challenge - Ready for a healthy change? Get some major motivation.
I have read and agreed to WebMD's Privacy Policy.
Enter cell phone number
- -
Entering your cell phone number and pressing submit indicates you agree to receive text messages from WebMD related to this challenge. WebMD is utilizing a 3rd party vendor, CellTrust, to provide the messages. You can opt out at any time.
Standard text rates apply