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Fitter Kids, Better Grades?

Researchers Find That Fitter Middle School Students Scored Better on Math and Reading Tests
By
WebMD Health News
Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

Aug. 3, 2012 -- Fitter kids do better on school tests according to new research that echoes previous findings.

Researcher Sudhish Srikanth, a University of North Texas student, says that fitter middle school students performed better on reading and math tests than their less fit peers. He presented his findings at the American Psychological Association's annual meeting in Orlando.

The researchers tested 1,211 students from five Texas middle schools. They looked at each student's academic self-concept -- how confident they were in their abilities to do well -- and took into account the student's socioeconomic status. Srikanth says they knew these two factors would play a role in how well the students did.

After those factors, they looked at others that might influence school performance, such as social support, fitness, and body composition. Of the other factors examined, Srikanth says, "cardiorespiratory fitness has the strongest effect on academic achievement."

The research doesn't prove cause and effect, and the researchers didn't try to explain the link. But other research suggests why fitness is so important, according to researcher Trent Petrie, PhD, director of the Center for Sport Psychology at the University of North Texas.

"Physical fitness is associated with improvements in memory, concentration, organization, and staying on task," he says.

Study Details

For one to five months before the students took standardized reading and math tests, they answered questions about:

  • Usual physical activity
  • Their view of their school ability
  • Self-esteem
  • Social support

The researchers assessed the students' fitness by using a variety of tests that looked at muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, aerobic capacity, and body composition.

Previous studies have found a link between fitness and improved school performance, Srikanth says. The new study also looked at several other possible influences.

For boys, having social support was related to better reading scores. For girls, a larger body mass index was the only factor other than fitness that predicted better reading scores. The researchers are not sure why.

Other studies have found fitness more important than weight for test scores.

For both boys and girls, fitness levels were the only factors studied (besides socioeconomic status and self-concept) in relation to math scores.

Srikanth found an upward trend, with more fitness linked with better scores. He says he can't quantify it beyond that.

The Evidence for More Activity Builds

The new research echoes that of James Sallis, PhD, distinguished professor of family and preventive medicine at the University of California, San Diego. A long-time researcher on physical fitness, he reviewed the findings. "The mountain of evidence just got higher that active and fit kids perform better in school," he says.

The finding that fitness was related to both reading and math scores in both girls and boys is impressive, he says. "I hope this study convinces both parents and school administrators to increase and improve physical education, recess, classroom activity breaks, after-school physical activity and sports, and walk-to-school programs."

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