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    Ready-to-Eat Foods for Toddlers Often Too Salty

    Parents urged to balance convenience with healthier meals, snacks

    WebMD News from HealthDay

    By Kathleen Doheny

    HealthDay Reporter

    THURSDAY, March 21 (HealthDay News) -- Those convenient, prepackaged meals and snacks for toddlers may contain worrisome levels of salt, U.S. researchers report.

    More than three quarters of 90 toddler meals evaluated by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention were high in sodium, according to a new study.

    Ready-to-eat foods for babies were less alarming, found the experts, who reported on the sodium content of 1,115 products for babies and toddlers using per-serving data from major and private-label brands.

    "The products we assessed for babies and infants were relatively low in sodium," said Joyce Maalouf, a fellow at the CDC division for heart disease and stroke prevention.

    "Unfortunately, the toddler food products -- meals and snacks -- have higher amounts of sodium," she said. Those products are aimed for kids 1 to 3 years old.

    She is scheduled to present the findings Thursday at a American Heart Association meeting in New Orleans.

    Eating too much sodium, the main component of salt, can lead to high blood pressure, which is a risk factor for heart disease and stroke.

    Moreover, studies have suggested that children's taste for salt may be reduced if they consume less sodium at a young age, Maalouf said. "Children are not born with a taste for salt," she noted.

    The researchers defined a product as high in sodium if it exceeded 210 milligrams (mg) per serving. The American Heart Association recommends limiting sodium intake to less than 1,500 mg a day, but some toddler meals contained as much as 630 mg per serving -- 40 percent of the recommended daily total.

    "The toddler meals ranged from 100 milligrams per serving up to 630 milligrams per serving," Maalouf said. The average was 369 mg, with 71 percent of the meals high in sodium.

    The researchers evaluated four toddler savory snacks, such as cheese and crackers, and found they ranged from 70 mg to 310 mg per serving.

    Cereal bars for toddlers ranged from zero to 85 mg of sodium per serving. Fruit snacks for toddlers ranged from zero to 60 mg per serving.

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