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Children's Health

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Kids Worldwide Getting Less Heart Fit: Study

Large study of running fitness in recent decades found today's children are much slower

WebMD News from HealthDay

By Dennis Thompson

HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Nov. 19, 2013 (HealthDay News) -- Children across the globe can't run as far or as fast as their parents did at their age, according to new research.

In a one-mile footrace, a kid today would finish a minute and a half behind a typical child from 1975, said study lead author Grant Tomkinson, a senior lecturer in the University of South Australia's School of Health Sciences.

"We all live in an environment that's toxic for exercise, and our children are paying the price," Tomkinson said.

Children today are about 15 percent less aerobically fit than their parents were as youngsters, Tomkinson and his colleagues discovered. In the United States it's even worse -- kids' heart endurance fell an average 6 percent in each of the three decades from 1970 to 2000.

These levels of fitness in childhood will more than likely result in worse health in adulthood, Tomkinson said. Kids will have weaker hearts and thinner bones, and an overall lower quality of life.

Tomkinson is scheduled to present his findings Tuesday at the American Heart Association's annual meeting in Dallas.

Sam Kass, executive director of Michelle Obama's Let's Move! initiative, called the results of the one-mile cross-generational footrace "shocking."

"It's clear over the last four decades we've been in a cycle of inactivity, and that's leading to some devastating health outcomes," Kass said.

The researchers came to their estimates by analyzing 50 studies on running fitness between now and 1964 that involved more than 25 million kids aged 9 to 17 in 28 countries.

Studies included in their analysis measured heart endurance by how far kids could run in a set time or how long it took them to run a set distance. Tests usually lasted five to 15 minutes or covered between a half-mile and two miles of running.

Endurance declined significantly over the years, but in ways that were similar between boys and girls and younger and older kids across different regions of the globe.

Because this study was presented at a medical meeting, the data and conclusions should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

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