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    Premature Infant's Inability to Maintain Body Heat

    A premature infant's body is not able to maintain body heat. It's important to prevent hypothermia, which is a loss of body heat that can be dangerous. So the infant is kept warm on a heated bed. This may be inside a draft-free enclosure (isolette or incubator) or under a radiant heater.

    As the infant's nervous system, skin, and metabolism mature, the infant is less likely to get hypothermia. At about 34 weeks' gestation, a premature infant usually can be moved into an open crib.

    ByHealthwise Staff
    Primary Medical ReviewerSarah Marshall, MD - Family Medicine
    Specialist Medical ReviewerKimberly Dow, MD, FRCPC - Neonatology

    Current as ofSeptember 9, 2014

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: September 09, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

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