Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Children's Health

Font Size
A
A
A

Puberty issues

Having an adolescent often brings up parents' uncomfortable memories of going through puberty themselves. Fortunately, education and support for adolescents during this period of life are becoming increasingly common. But adolescents still need parental guidance about what to expect and assurance that everyone goes through similar changes during puberty. When a teen is given encouragement, puberty can be a creative and affirming time of life.

Talk to your children before physical changes start to happen. Instead of overloading your child in one sitting, talk to your child over a period of a year or two about changes that are upcoming. Offer your child books about puberty that are geared toward teens, and set a time to talk about what your child learned.

Recommended Related to Children

Marlo Thomas: Championing Kids' Care

This Thanksgiving has special meaning for Emmy Award-winning actor, producer, and author Marlo Thomas. It’s the 50th anniversary of her family’s fundraising for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, located in Memphis, Tenn. St. Jude began as the dream of Marlo’s father, the late, great funnyman Danny Thomas, in 1957 and has been going strong ever since. Since his death in 1991, Marlo, along with her sister, Terre, and brother, Tony, has been at the forefront of the center’s fundraising. Focusing...

Read the Marlo Thomas: Championing Kids' Care article > >

Share some of your own teen experiences so that your child will know that Mom and Dad went through this time, too.

Young adolescents may not be aware of developing body odor and the need for deodorants and more frequent bathing. They may develop pimples, whiteheads and blackheads, or acne and need instruction on how to care for their skin. For more information, see the topic Acne.

Teach teens about the changes that occur with puberty, such as the following:

  • Girls' hips become more rounded.
  • Girls' nipples grow first and then the breast under them.
  • Girls and boys get fine pubic and underarm hair, and then the hair becomes coarser.
  • Boys' penises and testicles grow larger.
  • Boys sometimes have wet dreams.
  • Boys sometimes have temporary breast growth during puberty.
  • Menstruation is a sign that girls can become pregnant. Girls should be instructed on how to use pads or tampons. Explain that periods may not be regular at first but they typically last 4 to 6 days and occur every 21 to 45 days in the first two years.

Show compassion. Let your child know that you are there to help and will not tease or ridicule.

By Healthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer Susan C. Kim, MD - Pediatrics
Specialist Medical Reviewer Thomas Emmett Francoeur, MDCM, CSPQ, FRCPC - Pediatrics
Last Revised April 15, 2010

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: April 15, 2010
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

Today on WebMD

preschool age girl sitting at desk
Article
look at my hand
Slideshow
 
woman with cleaning products
Slideshow
young boy with fever
Article
 

worried kid
fitArticle
boy on father's shoulder
Article
 
Child with red rash on cheeks
Slideshow
girl thinking
Article
 

babyapp
New
Child with adhd
Slideshow
 
rl with friends
fitSlideshow
Syringes and graph illustration
Tool
 
6-Week Challenges
Want to know more?
Build a Fitter Family Challenge – Get your crew motivated to move.
Feed Your Family Better Challenge - Tips and tricks to healthy up your diet.
Sleep Better Challenge - Snooze clues for the whole family.
I have read and agreed to WebMD's Privacy Policy.
Enter cell phone number
- -
Entering your cell phone number and pressing submit indicates you agree to receive text messages from WebMD related to this challenge. WebMD is utilizing a 3rd party vendor, CellTrust, to provide the messages. You can opt out at any time.
Standard text rates apply

WebMD Special Sections