Sturge Weber Syndrome

Important

It is possible that the main title of the report Sturge Weber Syndrome is not the name you expected. Please check the synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and disorder subdivision(s) covered by this report.

Synonyms

  • Dimitri Disease
  • Encephalofacial Angiomatosis
  • Encephalotrigeminal Angiomatosis
  • Leptomeningeal Angiomatosis
  • Sturge-Kalischer-Weber Syndrome
  • Sturge-Weber Phakomatosis
  • SWS
  • Sturge-Weber-Krabbe Syndrome

Disorder Subdivisions

  • None

General Discussion

Summary

Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is a rare disorder characterized by the association of a facial birthmark called a port-wine birthmark, neurological abnormalities, and eye abnormalities such as glaucoma. SWS can be thought of as a spectrum of disease in which individuals may have abnormalities affecting all three of these systems (i.e. brain, skin and eyes), or only two, or only one. Consequently, the specific symptoms and severity of the disorder can vary dramatically from one person to another. Symptoms are usually present at birth (congenital), yet the disorder is not inherited and does not run in families. Some symptoms may not develop until adulthood. SWS is caused by a somatic mutation in the GNAQ gene. This mutation occurs randomly (sporadically) for no known reason.



Introduction

SWS may be classified as a neurocutaneous syndrome or one of the phakomatoses. Neurocutaneous syndromes or phakomatoses are broad terms for groups of disorders in which growths develop in the skin, brain, spinal cord, bones and sometimes other organs of the body. These growths consist of abnormal blood vessels.



Some publications break down SWS into three main subtypes. Type 1 consists of skin and neurological symptoms. These individuals may or may not have glaucoma. Type 2 consists of skin symptoms and possibly glaucoma, but there is no evidence of neurological involvement. Type 3 consists of neurological involvement, but without skin abnormalities. Glaucoma is usually not present. Type 3 may also be known as the isolated neurological variant.

Resources

The Arc

1825 K Street NW, Suite 1200

Washington, DC 20006

Tel: (202)534-3700

Fax: (202)534-3731

Tel: (800)433-5255

TDD: (817)277-0553

Email: info@thearc.org

Internet: http://www.thearc.org



Sturge-Weber Foundation

P.O. Box 418

Mt. Freedom, NJ 07970-0418

Tel: (973)895-4445

Fax: (973)895-4846

Tel: (800)627-5482

Email: swf@sturge-weber.org

Internet: http://www.sturge-weber.org



NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

P.O. Box 5801

Bethesda, MD 20824

Tel: (301)496-5751

Fax: (301)402-2186

Tel: (800)352-9424

TDD: (301)468-5981

Internet: http://www.ninds.nih.gov/



Vascular Birthmarks Foundation

P.O. Box 106

Latham, NY 12110

USA

Tel: (877)823-4646

Email: hvbf@aol.com

Internet: http://www.birthmark.org



Sturge Weber Foundation (UK)

Burleigh

348 Pinhoe Rd

Exeter

Devon, EX4 8AF

United Kingdom

Tel: 01392464675

Fax: 01392464675

Email: support@sturgeweber.org.uk

Internet: http://www.sturgeweber.org.uk



Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center

PO Box 8126

Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8126

Tel: (301)251-4925

Fax: (301)251-4911

Tel: (888)205-2311

TDD: (888)205-3223

Internet: http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/GARD/



National Organization of Vascular Anomalies

PO Box 38216

Greensboro, NC 27438-8216

Email: admin@mail.novanews.org

Internet: http://www.novanews.org



Hemispherectomy Foundation

P.O. Box 1239

Aledo, TX 76008

Tel: (817)307-9880

Email: info@hemifoundation.org

Internet: http://www.hemifoundation.intuitwebsites.com/welcome.html



Venous Disease Coalition

1075 S. Yukon Street, Suite 320

Suite 320

Lakewood, CO 80226

Tel: (303)989-0500

Fax: (303)989-0200

Tel: (888)833-4463

Email: info@venousdiseasecoalition.org

Internet: http://www.venousdiseasecoalition.org



For a Complete Report

This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). A copy of the complete report can be downloaded free from the NORD website for registered users. The complete report contains additional information including symptoms, causes, affected population, related disorders, standard and investigational therapies (if available), and references from medical literature. For a full-text version of this topic, go to www.rarediseases.org and click on Rare Disease Database under "Rare Disease Information".

The information provided in this report is not intended for diagnostic purposes. It is provided for informational purposes only. NORD recommends that affected individuals seek the advice or counsel of their own personal physicians.

It is possible that the title of this topic is not the name you selected. Please check the Synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and Disorder Subdivision(s) covered by this report

This disease entry is based upon medical information available through the date at the end of the topic. Since NORD's resources are limited, it is not possible to keep every entry in the Rare Disease Database completely current and accurate. Please check with the agencies listed in the Resources section for the most current information about this disorder.

For additional information and assistance about rare disorders, please contact the National Organization for Rare Disorders at P.O. Box 1968, Danbury, CT 06813-1968; phone (203) 744-0100; web site www.rarediseases.org or email orphan@rarediseases.org

Last Updated: 4/21/2014

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WebMD Medical Reference from the National Organization for Rare Disorders
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