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Abdominal Pain, Age 11 and Younger - Home Treatment

Most of the time, a child's abdominal pain will get better with home treatment and the child will not need a visit to a doctor.

Home treatment for abdominal pain often depends on other symptoms that are present with the pain, such as diarrhea, nausea, or vomiting. See the Related Information section of this topic for information on some of these other symptoms.

Try the following, one at a time in the order listed, if your child has mild abdominal pain without other symptoms:

  • Have your child rest when he or she has mild stomachaches. Most symptoms will get better or go away in 30 minutes.
  • Have your child sip clear fluids, such as water, broth, tea, or fruit juice diluted with water.
  • Have your child try to pass a stool.

If the measures above do not work, you may also try these:

  • Serve your child several small meals instead of 2 or 3 large ones.
  • Serve mild foods, such as rice, dry toast or crackers, gelatin, or applesauce. Do not give your child spicy foods, other fruits, or drinks that have caffeine or carbonation until 48 hours after all symptoms have gone away. These foods may make your child's stomachache worse.
  • Do not give your child any medicines without talking to the doctor first. Medicines may mask the pain or make it worse.

Symptoms to watch for during home treatment

Call your doctor if any of the following occur during home treatment:

  • Pain increases or localizes to one section of the abdomen.
  • Other symptoms develop, such as diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, or fever.
  • The belly feels hard or looks very swollen.
  • Symptoms become more severe or frequent.

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: May 09, 2013
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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