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Children's Health

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Oral Rehydration Solutions for Children - Topic Overview

When a child has diarrhea or is vomiting, it is important to replace the fluids he or she is losing. Give your child small sips of water. Let your child drink as much as he or she wants.

Ask your doctor if your child needs an oral rehydration solution (ORS) like Pedialyte or Infalyte. Oral rehydration solutions contain the right mix of salt, sugar, potassium, and other minerals to help replace lost fluids.

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Watch for signs of dehydration. As your child becomes dehydrated, thirst increases, and his or her mouth or eyes may feel or look very dry. Your child may also lack energy and want to be held a lot. Your child will not urinate as often as usual. If your child develops signs of dehydration, increase the amount of fluid you are giving.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: June 04, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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