Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Children's Health

Font Size

Preventing Poisoning in Young Children - Topic Overview

If you have a possible poisoning emergency, call 1-800-222-1222 and you will be automatically transferred to the closest poison control center.

Many of the items in our homes can be poisonous to children—household cleaners, medicines, cosmetics, garden products, and houseplants. If these items are not kept out of reach, your child could swallow, inhale, or eat these toxic substances or get them on his or her skin.

Recommended Related to Children

Superior Vena Cava Syndrome in Children

Superior vena cava syndrome in a child is a serious medical emergency because the child's windpipe can become blocked. Superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) in children can be life-threatening. This is because the trachea (windpipe) can quickly become blocked. In adults, the windpipe is fairly stiff, but in children, it is softer and can more easily be squeezed shut. Also, a child's windpipe is narrower, so any amount of swelling can cause breathing problems. Squeezing of the trachea is called superior...

Read the Superior Vena Cava Syndrome in Children article > >

Young children have the highest risk of poisoning because of their natural curiosity. Products that are poisonous to children can also harm pets.

Use the following tips to keep dangerous products or items away from children.

Preventing poisoning

  • Choose the least hazardous product available for the job.
  • Use the lowest-risk form and the smallest amount of product needed.
  • Never leave a poisonous product unattended, even for a moment. Many poisonings occur when an adult becomes distracted by the doorbell, a telephone, or some other interruption.
  • Keep household plants out of reach. Many are poisonous if they are chewed or ingested.
  • Use childproof latches on your cupboards. And be careful of what you store in your bedside table and other cupboards that are lower than your shoulder height.
  • Keep products in their original labeled containers. Never store poisonous products in food containers.
  • Use "Mr. Yuk" stickers, and teach your children to recognize them. These stickers are available from your local poison control center or hospital.
  • Post the phone number to the poison control center or emergency room in several places throughout the house.
  • Purchase items that are in child-resistant containers.
  • Choose multi-use products to cut down on the number of different chemicals around your house.
  • Read product labels for caution statements, how to use the product correctly, and first aid instructions. Common poisonous substances include:
    • Cosmetics, nail care products, and perfumes.
    • Arts and crafts products, such as glue.
    • Bleach, dishwater detergent, drain and toilet bowl cleaners, furniture polish, and other cleaning products.
    • Windshield washer fluid and antifreeze.
    • Turpentine products, kerosene, lye, lighter fluid, and paint thinners and solvents.
    • Garden products, especially products that kill insects, pests, or weeds.
    • Batteries and mothballs.
  • Reduce your child's exposure to lead in your home, drinking water, foods and other items. For more information, see the topic Lead Poisoning.

House and garden poisons

  • Keep products completely out of the reach and sight of children. Do not keep poisons, such as drain opener, detergent, oven cleaner, or plant food, under your kitchen sink.
  • Look for words that signal the level of poison danger in pesticide products. The word "Caution" on a pesticide label means the product is slightly toxic. The word "Warning" means the product is moderately toxic. And the word "Danger" means the product is highly toxic.1 For more information, go to the National Pesticide Information Center website at www.npic.orst.edu.
  • Use only nontoxic arts and crafts materials.
  • Check your home for lead paint chips if your home was built before 1978.
  • Don't forget your garage when poison-proofing your home. Keep poisons and flammables out of reach of children. For example, kerosene, lamp oil, gasoline, and fertilizers are all poisonous when ingested. Many products kept in garages also are fire hazards.
1|2

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: November 26, 2012
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
Next Article:

Today on WebMD

preschool age girl sitting at desk
Article
look at my hand
Slideshow
 
woman with cleaning products
Slideshow
young boy with fever
Article
 

worried kid
fitArticle
boy on father's shoulder
Article
 
Child with red rash on cheeks
Slideshow
girl thinking
Article
 

babyapp
New
Child with adhd
Slideshow
 
rl with friends
fitSlideshow
Syringes and graph illustration
Tool
 
6-Week Challenges
Want to know more?
Build a Fitter Family Challenge – Get your crew motivated to move.
Feed Your Family Better Challenge - Tips and tricks to healthy up your diet.
Sleep Better Challenge - Snooze clues for the whole family.
I have read and agreed to WebMD's Privacy Policy.
Enter cell phone number
- -
Entering your cell phone number and pressing submit indicates you agree to receive text messages from WebMD related to this challenge. WebMD is utilizing a 3rd party vendor, CellTrust, to provide the messages. You can opt out at any time.
Standard text rates apply

WebMD Special Sections