Skip to content

    Children's Health

    Font Size
    A
    A
    A

    Rash, Age 11 and Younger - Home Treatment

    Nonprescription medicines for itching

    Carefully read and follow all label directions on the medicine bottle or box.

    • Try calamine lotion for a rash caused by contact dermatitis, such as poison ivy or poison oak rashes.
    • For severe itching, apply hydrocortisone cream 4 times a day until the itch is gone. Note: Do not use the cream on children younger than age 2 unless your doctor tells you to do so. Do not use in the rectal or vaginal area on children younger than age 12 unless your doctor tells you to do so.
    • Try an oral antihistamine to help the scratch-itch cycle. Examples include chlorpheniramine maleate, such as Chlor-Trimeton, and diphenhydramine, such as Benadryl. Oral antihistamines are helpful when itching and discomfort are preventing your child from doing normal activities, such as going to school or getting to sleep. Don't give antihistamines to your child unless you've checked with the doctor first.
    Medicine you can buy without a prescription
    Try a nonprescription medicine to help treat your child's fever or pain:

    Talk to your child's doctor before switching back and forth between doses of acetaminophen and ibuprofen. When you switch between two medicines, there is a chance your child will get too much medicine.

    Safety tips
    Be sure to follow these safety tips when you use a nonprescription medicine:
    • Carefully read and follow all labels on the medicine bottle and box.
    • Give, but do not exceed, the maximum recommended doses.
    • Do not give your child a medicine if he or she has had an allergic reaction to it in the past.
    • Do not give aspirin to anyone younger than age 20 unless directed to do so by your child's doctor.
    • Do not give naproxen sodium (such as Aleve) to children younger than age 12 unless your child's doctor tells you to.

    Symptoms to watch for during home treatment

    Call your child's doctor if any of the following occur during home treatment:

    • Other symptoms, such as a fever, feeling ill, or signs of infection, are severe or become worse.
    • A new rash lasts longer than 2 weeks.
    • Your child's symptoms become more severe or more frequent.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: August 14, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
    1 | 2
    1 | 2
    Next Article:

    Today on WebMD

    child with red rash on cheeks
    What’s that rash?
    plate of fruit and veggies
    How healthy is your child’s diet?
     
    smiling baby
    Treating diarrhea, fever and more.
    Middle school band practice
    Understanding your child’s changing body.
     

    worried kid
    fitArticle
    jennifer aniston
    Slideshow
     
    Measles virus
    Article
    sick child
    Slideshow
     

    babyapp
    New
    Child with adhd
    Slideshow
     
    rl with friends
    fitSlideshow
    Syringes and graph illustration
    Tool