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    Speech and Language Development - Common Concerns

    Speech and language delays

    Mild and temporary speech delays can occur in some children.

    Some children learn new words faster than others do. If your child is not saying words by 18 months, or can say fewer than 50 words by 24 months, talk with your doctor. All children with a speech delay should have their hearing tested.

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    Keep in mind that many different things determine a child's speech development. Be aware of the common misconceptions about what causes speech and language delays, such as laziness or developmental differences between boys and girls. Even if some of these things contribute to a child's speaking slightly later than others of the same age, they are not the cause of significant speech delays. True delays are related to developmental or health issues, such as some types of hearing loss or a family history of speech and language delay.

    Red flags for speech and language developmental delays are generally based on established speech and language milestones. Talk to your child's doctor any time you have concerns. It is critical to identify speech and language delays early and rule out other conditions, such as difficulty hearing. Early diagnosis allows the doctor to recommend treatments that can help prevent long-term problems.

    Behavioral issues

    While they learn and master new language skills, children sometimes talk in ways that are demanding or impolite. For example, a child may say "Give me!" when he or she wants a toy. Often this behavior is the result of children's inability to find the words that fit their feelings, or they are simply repeating what is being said around them. Gently remind your child to use an appropriate voice and manners. And consistently model polite speech and behavior.

    Some parents think that their child is constantly talking or chattering. This is a child's way of practicing. It is not necessary for parents to listen and respond to everything a talkative child says, but don't completely tune out your chatterer either. Singing and dancing with your child and playing music or reading stories geared toward children will help your child learn to listen and to express himself or herself.

    Normal mistakes

    Most children make developmentally appropriate "mistakes" when they first learn to talk. For example, children commonly mispronounce words, such as saying "pasghetti" for "spaghetti." As children listen to other people, they often correct their mistakes. They learn to say words clearly and use grammar correctly through practice.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: September 09, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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