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Vomiting,Age 3 and Younger - Home Treatment

Newborns and babies through age 6 months

  • Be sure to watch your baby carefully for dehydration. Signs include your baby being thirstier than usual and having less urine than usual.
  • If your baby is breast-fed, continue breast-feeding. Offer each breast to your baby for 1 to 2 minutes every 10 minutes.
  • Do not give your baby plain water.
  • If your baby is formula-fed, switch to an oral rehydration solution (ORS).
    • Offer 0.5 fl oz (15 mL) of the drink every 10 minutes for the first hour. If your baby has trouble drinking that amount at a time, you can give small sips (about 5 mL) instead. Just give the smaller sips more often.
    • After the first hour, gradually increase the amount of ORS that you offer your baby.
    • When 6 hours have passed without vomiting, you may resume your child's regular formula feedings.
  • Do not give your child any medicine—prescription, nonprescription, herbal, or home remedies—without your doctor specifically telling you to do so.

Children 7 months to 12 months

  • Give 0.5 fl oz (15 mL) of oral rehydration solution (ORS) every 10 minutes. If your baby has trouble drinking that amount at a time, you can give small sips (about 5 mL) instead. Just give the smaller sips more often.
    • After the first hour, gradually increase the amount of ORS that you offer your baby.
    • When 6 hours have passed without vomiting, you may slowly resume your child's regular formula feedings.
    • Offer bananas, cereals, crackers, or other mild baby foods to your baby.
    • You can also offer ORS frozen pops to your child.
  • Do not give your child plain water, fruit juice, or soda pop. Fruit juice and soda pop contain too much sugar and not enough of the essential minerals (electrolytes) that are being lost. Plain water and diet soda pop lack calories that your child needs.
  • Do not give your child any medicine—prescription, nonprescription, herbal, or home remedies—without your doctor specifically telling you to do so.

Children over 1 year

  • Give 1 fl oz (30 mL) of a clear liquid every 20 minutes for 1 hour. If your child has trouble drinking that amount at a time, you can give small sips (about 5 mL) instead. Just give the smaller sips more often.
  • Increase the volume of clear liquids that you give by 3 fl oz (90 mL) an hour for each hour that your child does not vomit. For example, give your child:
    • 2 fl oz (60 mL) of fluid every 20 minutes during the second hour for a total of 6 ounces (180 mL) in the second hour.
    • 3 fl oz (90 mL) of fluid every 20 minutes during the third hour for a total of 9 ounces (270 mL) in the third hour.
  • Clear liquids include oral rehydration solution (ORS), clear broth, and gelatin dessert.
  • You can also offer ORS frozen pops to your child.
  • Do not give your child plain water, fruit juice, or soda pop unless you do not have any other rehydration fluids available. Fruit juice and soda pop contain too much sugar and not enough of the essential minerals (electrolytes) that are being lost. Plain water and diet soda pop lack calories that your child needs.
  • Gradually start to offer your child regular foods after 6 hours with no vomiting.
    • Offer your child solid foods if he or she was eating solids before. Offer crackers, toast, broths, mild soups, mashed potatoes, rice, and breads to your older child.
    • Avoid high-fiber foods, such as beans, and foods with a lot of sugar, such as candy or ice cream.
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WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: May 10, 2013
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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