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Antihistamines for Itching From Chickenpox

Examples

Generic Name Brand Name
diphenhydramine Benadryl
hydroxyzine Vistaril

Antihistamines can be taken by mouth or applied directly to the skin. Talk to your doctor before using any antihistamine lotions or creams on yourself or your child. And check with your child's doctor before giving antihistamine pills to your child.

How It Works

Antihistamines block histamines—chemicals that cause itching and other responses to allergic substances.

Why It Is Used

Antihistamines can reduce itching and scratching from chickenpox (varicella) blisters. Scratching of blisters can cause skin infection and scars. Some skin infections can be serious.

How Well It Works

Antihistamines taken by mouth may help prevent you or your child from scratching the rash and blisters, especially during sleep.

Side Effects

All medicines have side effects. But many people don't feel the side effects, or they are able to deal with them. Ask your pharmacist about the side effects of each medicine you take. Side effects are also listed in the information that comes with your medicine.

Here are some important things to think about:

  • Usually the benefits of the medicine are more important than any minor side effects.
  • Side effects may go away after you take the medicine for a while.
  • If side effects still bother you and you wonder if you should keep taking the medicine, call your doctor. He or she may be able to lower your dose or change your medicine. Do not suddenly quit taking your medicine unless your doctor tells you to.

Call911or other emergency services right away if you have:

Call your doctor if you have:

Common side effects of this medicine include:

See Drug Reference for a full list of side effects. (Drug Reference is not available in all systems.)

What To Think About

If you use antihistamines, carefully follow the directions on the label. Check with your child's doctor before you give them to your child. Children tend to be more sensitive to the effects of antihistamines.

  • Serious side effects, such as seizures, are more likely to occur in infants and young children.
  • Having nightmares or unusual excitement, or being nervous, restless, or cranky may be more likely in children than in adults.
  • Antihistamines have side effects that can cover up signs of serious complications of chickenpox. Some of these side effects include feeling sleepy and having hallucinations.

Avoid using antihistamines that are applied directly to the skin. You may accidentally apply too much medicine, which can be harmful.

Taking medicine

Medicine is one of the many tools your doctor has to treat a health problem. Taking medicine as your doctor suggests will improve your health and may prevent future problems. If you don't take your medicines properly, you may be putting your health (and perhaps your life) at risk.

There are many reasons why people have trouble taking their medicine. But in most cases, there is something you can do. For suggestions on how to work around common problems, see the topic Taking Medicines as Prescribed.

Advice for women

If you are pregnant, breast-feeding, or planning to get pregnant, do not use any medicines unless your doctor tells you to. Some medicines can harm your baby. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, herbs, and supplements. And make sure that all your doctors know that you are pregnant, breast-feeding, or planning to get pregnant.

Checkups

Follow-up care is a key part of your treatment and safety. Be sure to make and go to all appointments, and call your doctor if you are having problems. It's also a good idea to know your test results and keep a list of the medicines you take.

Complete the new medication information form (PDF)(What is a PDF document?) to help you understand this medication.

By Healthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer John Pope, MD - Pediatrics
Specialist Medical Reviewer Thomas Emmett Francoeur, MD, MDCM, CSPQ, FRCPC - Pediatrics
Current as of August 23, 2013

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: August 23, 2013
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

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