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Diphtheria, Tetanus, Polio, and Rubella Vaccines for People Who Are HIV-Infected

People who have the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can be given vaccines for diphtheria and tetanus.

Adults with HIV who need polio immunization should receive inactivated (Salk), rather than live (Sabin), vaccine.

Recommended Related to Children's Vaccines

Understanding Tetanus -- the Basics

Tetanus is a dangerous nerve ailment caused by the toxin of a common bacterium, Clostridium tetani. Bacterial spores are found in soil -- most frequently in cultivated soil, least frequently in virgin soil. The spores can remain infectious for more than 40 years in soil. They also exist in environments as diverse as animal excrement, house dust, and the human colon. If the spores enter a wound that penetrates the skin and extends deeper than oxygen can reach, they germinate and produce a toxin that...

Read the Understanding Tetanus -- the Basics article > >

There is no information about the value of rubella (3-day or German measles) vaccine for HIV-infected adults, so the vaccine is not recommended for people who have HIV.

By Healthwise Staff
Primary Medical Reviewer E. Gregory Thompson, MD - Internal Medicine
Specialist Medical Reviewer Peter Shalit, MD, PhD - Internal Medicine
Last Revised April 8, 2010

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: April 08, 2010
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

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