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Immunizations That May Cause Fever

Short-term, mild reactions to immunizations are common. Immunizations that may cause a fever include:

  • Diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis (DTaP) or diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus (DPT). Babies can have a fever of up to 104°F (40°C) within 2 to 3 hours of getting the DTaP or DPT shot. Children may be fussy and have other mild symptoms such as poor appetite, sleepiness, or redness and swelling at the shot site for a few days.
  • Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR). The shot site may become red, swollen, hard, and slightly warm within the first 24 to 48 hours. Fever also may occur up to 2 weeks after the shot. A mild rash may develop up to 3 weeks after the shot.

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical ReviewerWilliam H. Blahd, Jr., MD, FACEP - Emergency Medicine
Specialist Medical ReviewerH. Michael O'Connor, MD - Emergency Medicine
Last RevisedSeptember 13, 2012

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: September 13, 2012
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

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