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Immunizations - Childhood Immunizations

Recommended immunizations

The U.S. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American Academy of Family Physicians recommend a specific childhood immunization schedule each year. Immunizations are recommended, because they protect against diseases (give immunity) or make a disease less severe if your child does get it. The schedule outlines the immunizations and booster shots needed from birth through age 18, as well as when catch-up immunizations should be given.

The schedule for a premature infant is the same as for a full-term infant. But sometimes the hepatitis B vaccine is delayed.

Recommended Related to Children's Vaccines

Prevent Meningitis: Tips to Protect Your Teen

There's a lot you can do to help prevent meningitis in your teen. A meningococcal vaccine can help prevent the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in teens. Your teen can also take steps to enhance his or her immune system and to prevent the spread of the disease.

Read the Prevent Meningitis: Tips to Protect Your Teen article > >

Many immunizations require more than one dose, given at varying intervals. Although your child does not need to restart the series if a scheduled dose is missed, the immunization should be given as soon as possible.

Immunizations recommended for children younger than 11 years of age include:5

Chickenpox (varicella)(What is a PDF document?)

This shot (called Varivax) protects against chickenpox.

Who should get it?

  • Two doses are given to all children 12 months of age and older who have not had chickenpox—one at age 12 to 15 months and one at age 4 to 6 years.

The combination MMRV (ProQuad) shot can be given in place of Varivax. The vaccines for chickenpox, measles, mumps, and rubella are all in this one shot.

Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTaP)(What is a PDF document?)

This shot (immunization) protects against diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough (pertussis).

Who should get it?

  • Five doses are given to all children—one at age 2 months, one at 4 months, one at 6 months, one at 15 to 18 months, and one at 4 to 6 years.

Flu (influenza)(What is a PDF document?)

This immunization helps protect against the flu. Flu viruses are always changing, so the flu vaccines are updated every year.

Who should get it?

  • All people ages 6 months and older need one dose each year. Children younger than 9 years of age may need two doses depending on when they started getting this yearly immunization.

Healthy children ages 2 and older can usually get the nasal spray form (FluMist)(What is a PDF document?) instead of the flu shot(What is a PDF document?). Protection lasts up to a year for both vaccine types. For the most current CDC guidelines about the flu, go to www.cdc.gov/flu.

Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib)(What is a PDF document?)

This shot protects against bacteria that can cause an infection in the lungs (pneumonia) or the covering of the brain (meningitis), skin and bone infections, and other serious illnesses in young children. It does not protect against viral influenza (flu).

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