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    Cholesterol & Triglycerides Health Center

    News and Features Related to Cholesterol Management

    1. Statin Risks Outweighed by Statin Benefits

      March 1, 2012 -- Are the benefits of cholesterol-lowering statin drugs worth their risks? It seems that every week there's news about statins. One week there's a scare about possible new or underappreciated risks. The next week, you hear they are the best thing ever. What's the truth? To answer comm

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    2. New Warnings on Cholesterol-Lowering Statins

      Feb. 28, 2012 -- Memory loss, confusion, high blood sugar, and type 2 diabetes are possible side effects of the popular cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins, the FDA warns. Brand name and generic versions of statin drugs must carry these warnings on their labels, the FDA today announced. The

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    3. Statins May Raise Diabetes Risk in Older Women

      Jan. 9, 2012 -- Use of cholesterol-lowering statin drugs may be associated with an increased risk of diabetes in middle-aged and older women, a new study suggests. Experts say the evidence as a whole suggests that the risks are slight and that for most women who take statins, the benefits for preven

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    4. FAQ: Generic Lipitor

      Nov. 29, 2011 -- The cholesterol-lowering drug Lipitor -- the best-selling prescription drug in world history -- will be available as a generic drug beginning Nov. 30. Lipitor's generic name is atorvastatin. Two generic drugmakers, Ranbaxy and Watson, can start selling generic atorvastatin in the U.

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    5. Pill May Boost HDL 'Good' Cholesterol

      Nov. 15, 2011 (Orlando, Fla.) -- Once again, an experimental pill that boosts levels of HDL "good" cholesterol has shown promising results in a mid-stage study. In a three-month study of nearly 400 people, the drug evacetrapib raised HDL and lowered LDL, the so-called "bad cholesterol" -- both when

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    6. Cholesterol Levels Linked to Brain Changes of Alzheimer’s Disease

      Sept. 12, 2011 -- High cholesterol levels are associated with changes in the brain that are characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease, a new study shows. For the study, which is published in the journal Neurology, researchers used blood tests to measure cholesterol in 147 Japanese adults 10 to 15 years

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    7. New Drug Boosts 'Good' Cholesterol

      Aug. 29, 2011 (Paris) -- An experimental pill that boosts levels of "good" HDL cholesterol produced encouraging results in a mid-stage study, researchers say. In the nine-month study of about 475 patients, dalcetrapib raised HDL levels by 31% compared with placebo. It did so without increasing blood

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    8. Diet for Lowering Cholesterol: Soy Beats Low-Fat

      Aug. 23, 2011 -- A diet that incorporates cholesterol-lowering foods like soy, nuts, and plant sterols may work better at lowering cholesterol levels than a traditional low-fat diet. A new study shows that people with high cholesterol who followed the portfolio diet, which includes a combination of

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    9. FDA Limits Highest Dose of Zocor

      June 9, 2011 -- The FDA today tightened its rules on who should take the highest approved dose of the statin drug simvastatin. Simvastatin, which lowers LDL "bad" cholesterol, is sold under the brand name Zocor and as a generic drug. It's also an active ingredient in the drugs Vytorin and Simcor. Du

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    10. Drugs for Bone Loss May Also Help the Heart

      April 28, 2011 -- An early report of a new study shows that the first-generation bisphosphonate, Didronel, in combination with the cholesterol drug Lipitor reduced abdominal aortic plaques by about 12% in people with high cholesterol, compared to 1% in people on Lipitor alone. Those in the combinati

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    Is This Normal? Get the Facts Fast!

    Is Your Cholesterol Level Heart Healthy?
    What is your LDL (low-density lipoprotein) level?

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    or
    Answer:
    Desirable
    0-199
    Borderline
    200-239
    High
    240+

    Your level is currently

    Congratulations! Your total cholesterol level is in the Desirable range, and your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is optimal.

    Congratulations! Your total cholesterol level is in the Desirable range, and your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is near optimal.

    Your total cholesterol level is in the Desirable range, but your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is borderline high. If your LDL goes higher, your total cholesterol level could become Borderline High. Consider reducing the amount of foods you eat with saturated fats and increasing physical activity. If you get more exercise, your level of "good" HDL cholesterol may increase, which could also help to keep your levels of LDL and total cholesterol in check.

    Your total cholesterol level is in the Desirable range, but your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is High. This may mean that your level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or "good" cholesterol, is too low. It is best to have a high level of "good" HDL and a low level of "bad" LDL. The HDL helps keep your LDL level in check. Ask your doctor for your HDL level. If your HDL is low, increasing your physical activity can increase it, which may help reduce your LDL level.

    Your total cholesterol level is in the Desirable range, but your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is Very High. This may mean that your level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or "good" cholesterol, is too low. It is best to have a high level of "good" HDL and a low level of "bad" LDL because the HDL helps keep your LDL level in check. Ask your doctor for your HDL level. If your HDL is low, increasing your physical activity can increase it, which may help reduce your LDL level.

    Your total cholesterol level is Borderline High, but fortunately your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is optimal. This could mean you have a high level of high-density lipoprotein, or "good" HDL cholesterol, which protects against heart disease. Or you could have other non-measured increases in LDL-like particles that can increase heart disease. Your LDL level also could be optimal if you are taking a statin medication. Please check with your doctor to get your complete lipid profile and see if you may need additional treatment. In the meantime, find more information on WebMD's Cholesterol Health Center.

    Your total cholesterol level is Borderline High, but fortunately your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is near optimal. This could mean you have a high level of high-density lipoprotein, or "good" HDL cholesterol, which protects against heart disease. Or you could have other non-measured increases in LDL-like particles that can increase heart disease. Your LDL level also could be optimal if you are taking a statin medication. Please check with your doctor to get your complete lipid profile and see if you may need additional treatment. In the meantime, find more information on WebMD's Cholesterol Health Center.

    Your total cholesterol level is Borderline High. Your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is Borderline High, too. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels!

    Your total cholesterol level is Borderline High. Your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is High. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels!

    Your total cholesterol level is Borderline High. But your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is Very High. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels!

    Your total cholesterol is High, but your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is optimal. This could mean you have a high level of high-density lipoprotein, or "good" HDL cholesterol, which protects against heart disease. Or you could have elevated secondary lipids, such as non-HDL particles that increase the risk of heart disease. Your LDL level also could be optimal if you are taking a statin medication. Please check with your doctor to get your complete lipid profile and see if you may need additional treatment. In the meantime, find more information on WebMD's Cholesterol Health Center.

    Your total cholesterol is High, but your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is near optimal. This could mean you have a high level of high-density lipoprotein, or "good" HDL cholesterol, which protects against heart disease. Or you could have elevated secondary lipids, such as non-HDL particles that increase the risk of heart disease. Your LDL level also could be optimal if you are taking a statin medication. Please check with your doctor to get your complete lipid profile and see if you may need additional treatment. In the meantime, find more information on WebMD's Cholesterol Health Center.

    Your total cholesterol level is High. Your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is Borderline High. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels!

    Your total cholesterol level is High. Your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is High, too. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels! If you are struggling to bring down your total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels, your doctor may prescribe medication, such as statins. Following medication, dietary, and exercise instructions should result in improvements.

    Your total cholesterol level is High, and your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is Very High. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels! If you are struggling to bring down your total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels, your doctor may prescribe statins or other cholesterol-lowering medications.

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