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    Cholesterol & Triglycerides Health Center

    News Related to Cholesterol Management

    1. Generic Crestor Approved by FDA

      April 29, 2016 -- The first generic version of the cholesterol-lowering statin drug Crestor (rosuvastatin calcium) tablets was approved Friday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The generic version from Watson Pharmaceuticals Inc. of New Jersey received approval to market generic rosuvastatin

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    2. Genetic High Cholesterol More Common Than Thought

      By Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, March 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Twice as many people as previously thought are genetically predisposed to develop dangerously high cholesterol levels, new research suggests. Familial hypercholesterolemia, as this condition is called, significantly ups the

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    3. Too Few Are Taking Needed Cholesterol Drugs

      By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Dec. 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of American adults who should be taking cholesterol-lowering drugs don't, federal government researchers report. They also found that blacks and Hispanics were less likely than whites to take medications that

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    4. Negative Statin News Tied to Dropped Prescriptions

      By Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter WEDNESDAY, Dec. 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- News reports on the downsides of statins may push some people to stop taking the cholesterol-lowering drugs, a new study hints. The findings, published Dec. 2 in the European Heart Journal, cannot prove that media stories d

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    5. 1 in 8 Adults Still Have High Cholesterol: CDC

      By Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Dec. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- About one in every eight American adults continue to have high levels of total cholesterol, while even more have low levels of "good" cholesterol, health officials reported Tuesday. Although the percentage of adults with

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    6. Statins May Dampen Flu Vaccine Powers

      By Randy Dotinga HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Oct. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Two new studies raise the possibility that the popular cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins may blunt the effectiveness of flu vaccines in seniors. But experts caution that more research is needed to better unders

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    7. High Cholesterol Linked to Tendon Trouble

      By Robert Preidt HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- High cholesterol levels may increase your risk of tendon problems and pain, a new study suggests. Tendons are the tough fibers connecting the body's muscles and bones. The researchers suspect cholesterol buildup in immune

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    8. Gut Bugs May Affect Body Fat, 'Good' Cholesterol

      By Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Sept. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The size of your waistline may depend to some degree on the specific bacteria dwelling within your gut, new research suggests. The study, of nearly 900 Dutch adults, found that certain gut bacteria might help determine not

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    9. New Cholesterol Drugs Overpriced, Analysis Says

      Sept. 9, 2015 -- Two newly approved drugs to fight high cholesterol are extremely overpriced compared to the health benefits they give to patients, a new analysis finds. The drugs in question, Repatha and Praluent, currently cost more than $14,000 per year, and because millions of Americans have hig

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    10. A New Way to Treat High Cholesterol?

      Editor's note: Updated Aug. 28, 2015. June 10, 2015 -- A new class of medications can lower "bad" LDL cholesterol to unheard-of levels. The new class is called PCSK9 inhibitors. The FDA approved the first drug, called alirocumab (Praluent), on July 24, and the second, evolocumab (Repatha), on Aug. 2

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    Displaying 1 - 10 of 290 Articles Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next >>

    Is This Normal? Get the Facts Fast!

    Is Your Cholesterol Level Heart Healthy?
    What is your LDL (low-density lipoprotein) level?

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    or
    Answer:
    Desirable
    0-199
    Borderline
    200-239
    High
    240+

    Your level is currently

    Congratulations! Your total cholesterol level is in the Desirable range, and your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is optimal.

    Congratulations! Your total cholesterol level is in the Desirable range, and your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is near optimal.

    Your total cholesterol level is in the Desirable range, but your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is borderline high. If your LDL goes higher, your total cholesterol level could become Borderline High. Consider reducing the amount of foods you eat with saturated fats and increasing physical activity. If you get more exercise, your level of "good" HDL cholesterol may increase, which could also help to keep your levels of LDL and total cholesterol in check.

    Your total cholesterol level is in the Desirable range, but your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is High. This may mean that your level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or "good" cholesterol, is too low. It is best to have a high level of "good" HDL and a low level of "bad" LDL. The HDL helps keep your LDL level in check. Ask your doctor for your HDL level. If your HDL is low, increasing your physical activity can increase it, which may help reduce your LDL level.

    Your total cholesterol level is in the Desirable range, but your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is Very High. This may mean that your level of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or "good" cholesterol, is too low. It is best to have a high level of "good" HDL and a low level of "bad" LDL because the HDL helps keep your LDL level in check. Ask your doctor for your HDL level. If your HDL is low, increasing your physical activity can increase it, which may help reduce your LDL level.

    Your total cholesterol level is Borderline High, but fortunately your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is optimal. This could mean you have a high level of high-density lipoprotein, or "good" HDL cholesterol, which protects against heart disease. Or you could have other non-measured increases in LDL-like particles that can increase heart disease. Your LDL level also could be optimal if you are taking a statin medication. Please check with your doctor to get your complete lipid profile and see if you may need additional treatment. In the meantime, find more information on WebMD's Cholesterol Health Center.

    Your total cholesterol level is Borderline High, but fortunately your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is near optimal. This could mean you have a high level of high-density lipoprotein, or "good" HDL cholesterol, which protects against heart disease. Or you could have other non-measured increases in LDL-like particles that can increase heart disease. Your LDL level also could be optimal if you are taking a statin medication. Please check with your doctor to get your complete lipid profile and see if you may need additional treatment. In the meantime, find more information on WebMD's Cholesterol Health Center.

    Your total cholesterol level is Borderline High. Your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is Borderline High, too. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels!

    Your total cholesterol level is Borderline High. Your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is High. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels!

    Your total cholesterol level is Borderline High. But your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is Very High. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels!

    Your total cholesterol is High, but your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is optimal. This could mean you have a high level of high-density lipoprotein, or "good" HDL cholesterol, which protects against heart disease. Or you could have elevated secondary lipids, such as non-HDL particles that increase the risk of heart disease. Your LDL level also could be optimal if you are taking a statin medication. Please check with your doctor to get your complete lipid profile and see if you may need additional treatment. In the meantime, find more information on WebMD's Cholesterol Health Center.

    Your total cholesterol is High, but your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is near optimal. This could mean you have a high level of high-density lipoprotein, or "good" HDL cholesterol, which protects against heart disease. Or you could have elevated secondary lipids, such as non-HDL particles that increase the risk of heart disease. Your LDL level also could be optimal if you are taking a statin medication. Please check with your doctor to get your complete lipid profile and see if you may need additional treatment. In the meantime, find more information on WebMD's Cholesterol Health Center.

    Your total cholesterol level is High. Your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is Borderline High. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels!

    Your total cholesterol level is High. Your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is High, too. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels! If you are struggling to bring down your total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels, your doctor may prescribe medication, such as statins. Following medication, dietary, and exercise instructions should result in improvements.

    Your total cholesterol level is High, and your level of "bad" LDL cholesterol is Very High. Working to bring down your total cholesterol decreases your LDL cholesterol level. You can do this by exercising more and eating less food with saturated fats. Check food labels! If you are struggling to bring down your total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels, your doctor may prescribe statins or other cholesterol-lowering medications.

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