Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Cold, Flu, & Cough Health Center

Font Size

Influenza (Seasonal Flu) - Topic Overview

You can help prevent the flu by getting the flu vaccine every year. It's best to get the vaccine as soon as it's available. You can get the vaccine as a shot or in a spray that you breathe in through your nose.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that everyone 6 months old and older should get a flu vaccine. The vaccine is especially important for people who are at higher risk of problems from the flu, including:

  • Young children.
  • Adults ages 50 and older.
  • Adults and children who have long-term health problems or an impaired immune system.
  • Women who will be pregnant during the flu season.

The flu vaccine is also important for health care workers and anyone who lives or works with a person who is at higher risk of problems from the flu.

The vaccine usually prevents most cases of the flu. But even if you do get the flu after you've had the vaccine, your symptoms will be milder and you'll have less chance of problems from the flu. You cannot get the flu from the flu vaccine.

Learning about influenza (flu):

Being diagnosed:

Getting treatment:

Ongoing concerns:

Taking care of yourself:

1|2
1|2

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: January 15, 2013
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
Next Article:

Today on WebMD

neti pot
Slideshow
Chicken soup
Slideshow
 
Natural Cold Flu Remedies Slideshow
Slideshow
Syringes and graph illustration
TOOL
 
Natural Cold Flu Remedies Slideshow
Slideshow
blowing nose
Video
 
Allergy And Sinus Symptom Evaluator
Health Check
Boy holding ear
Article
 
woman receiving vaccine shot
Article
Bacterial or Viral Infection
Video
 
How To Calm Your Cough
Quiz
Sore Throat
Slideshow
 

WebMD Special Sections