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    Colorectal Cancer Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Colorectal Cancer

    1. Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Stage 0 Colon Cancer Treatment

      Stage 0 colon cancer is the most superficial of all the lesions and is limited to the mucosa without invasion of the lamina propria. Because of its superficial nature, the surgical procedure may be limited.Standard Treatment Options for Stage 0 Colon CancerSurgeryStandard treatment options for stage 0 colon cancer include the following:Local excision or simple polypectomy with clear margins.Colon resection for larger lesions not amenable to local excision.Current Clinical TrialsCheck for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with stage 0 colon cancer. The list of clinical trials can be further narrowed by location, drug, intervention, and other criteria.General information about clinical trials is also available from the NCI Web site.

    2. Colorectal Cancer, Metastatic or Recurrent - About This PDQ Summary

      About PDQPhysician Data Query (PDQ) is the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) comprehensive cancer information database. The PDQ database contains summaries of the latest published information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come in two versions. The health professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to-understand, nontechnical language. Both versions have cancer information that is accurate and up to date and most versions are also available in Spanish.PDQ is a service of the NCI. The NCI is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIH is the federal government's center of biomedical research. The PDQ summaries are based on an independent review of the medical literature. They are not policy statements of the NCI or the NIH.Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary has current

    3. Colorectal Cancer - Stage IV and Recurrent Rectal Cancer

      Treatment options for local control:Resection of locally recurrent rectal cancer may be curative in selected patients.[1]Palliative surgical resection with either low-anterior resection (LAR) or abdominoperineal resection (APR).[1] Palliative radiation therapy.[2,3]Palliative chemotherapy.[4,5,6,7,8,9,10]Palliative chemoradiation.[11,12]Chemotherapy alone for local control.Palliative, endoscopic-placed stents to relieve obstruction.[13]Treatment options for systemic control:Resection of liver metastases in selected patients (5-year cure rate with resection of solitary metastases exceeds 20%).[14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23]Resection of isolated pulmonary or ovarian metastases.Systemic chemotherapy (see below).Clinical trials evaluating new drugs.Metastatic Rectal CancerTreatment of patients with recurrent or advanced colorectal cancer depends on the location of the disease. For patients with locally

    4. Colorectal Cancer - Overview

      Note: Separate PDQ summaries on Colorectal Cancer Screening; Colon Cancer Treatment; and Rectal Cancer Treatment are also available.Factors Associated With Increased Risk of Colorectal CancerExcessive alcohol useBased on solid evidence from observational studies, excessive alcohol use is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC).[1,2,3]Magnitude of Effect: A pooled analysis of eight cohort studies estimated an adjusted relative risk (RR) of 1.41 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.16–1.72) for consumption exceeding 45 g/day.Study Design: Cohort studies.Internal Validity: Fair.Consistency: Fair.External Validity: Fair.Cigarette smokingBased on solid evidence, cigarette smoking is associated with increased incidence and mortality from CRC.Magnitude of Effect: A pooled analysis of 106 observational studies estimated an adjusted RR (current smokers vs. never smokers) for developing CRC of 1.18 (95% CI, 1.11–1.25).Study Design:

    5. Colon Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (10 / 15 / 2014)

      The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.Changes were made to this summary to match those made to the health professional version.

    6. Colorectal Cancer, Metastatic or Recurrent - Get More Information From NCI

      Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

    7. Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - General Information About Colon Cancer

      Colon cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the colon.The colon is part of the body's digestive system. The digestive system removes and processes nutrients (vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and water) from foods and helps pass waste material out of the body. The digestive system is made up of the esophagus, stomach, and the small and large intestines. The first 6 feet of the large intestine are called the large bowel or colon. The last 6 inches are the rectum and the anal canal. The anal canal ends at the anus (the opening of the large intestine to the outside of the body).Anatomy of the lower digestive system, showing the colon and other organs.Gastrointestinal stromal tumors can occur in the colon. See the PDQ summary on Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Treatment for more information. See the PDQ summary about Unusual Cancers of Childhood for information about colorectal cancer in children.Health history can affect the risk of

    8. Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - General Information About Rectal Cancer

      Rectal cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the rectum. The rectum is part of the body’s digestive system. The digestive system removes and processes nutrients (vitamins,minerals,carbohydrates,fats,proteins,and water) from foods and helps pass waste material out of the body. The digestive system is made up of the esophagus,stomach,and the small ...

    9. Rectal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - General Information About Colorectal Cancer

      Colorectal cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the colon or the rectum. The colon is part of the body's digestive system. The digestive system removes and processes nutrients (vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and water) from foods and helps pass waste material out of the body. The digestive system is made up of the mouth, throat, esophagus, stomach, and the small and large intestines. The first 6 feet of the large intestine are called the large bowel or colon. The last 6 inches are the rectum and the anal canal. The anal canal ends at the anus (the opening of the large intestine to the outside of the body). Anatomy of the lower digestive system, showing the colon and other organs.Cancer that begins in the colon is called colon cancer, and cancer that begins in the rectum is called rectal cancer. Cancer that affects either of these organs may also be called colorectal cancer.See the following PDQ summaries for more information

    10. Colorectal Cancer, Metastatic or Recurrent - Significance

      Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignant neoplasm worldwide [1] and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States.[2] It is estimated that there will be 142,820 new cases diagnosed in the United States in 2013 and 50,830 deaths due to this disease. From 2005 to 2009, CRC incidence declined by 4.1% per year among adults aged 50 years and older. However, in adults younger than 50 years, CRC incidence rates have been increasing by 1.1% per year. From 2005 to 2009, mortality from CRC declined by 2.4% per year in men and 3.1% per year in women.[2] The incidence is higher in men than in women. It ranges from 46.1 per 100,000 per year in Hispanic men to 66.9 per 100,000 per year in African American men. In women, it ranges from 31.9 per 100,000 per year in Hispanics to 50.3 per 100,000 per year in African Americans.[3] The age-adjusted mortality rates for men and women are 20.2 per 100,000 per year in men and 14.1 per 100,000 per year in women.[3] About 5%

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