Skip to content

    Colorectal Cancer Health Center

    Medical Reference Related to Colorectal Cancer

    1. Colorectal Cancer, Metastatic or Recurrent - What is screening?

      Screening is looking for cancer before a person has any symptoms. This can help find cancer at an early stage. When abnormal tissue or cancer is found early,it may be easier to treat. By the time symptoms appear,cancer may have begun to spread. Scientists are trying to better understand which people are more likely to get certain types of cancer. They also study the things we do and the ...

    2. Colorectal Cancer, Metastatic or Recurrent - Stage Information for Rectal Cancer

      Treatment decisions should be made with reference to the TNM classification system,[1] rather than the older Dukes or the Modified Astler-Coller classification schema. The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and a National Cancer Institute-sponsored panel recommended that at least 12 lymph nodes be examined in patients with colon and rectal cancer to confirm the absence of nodal involvement by the tumor.[2,3,4] This recommendation takes into consideration that the number of lymph nodes examined is a reflection of both the aggressiveness of lymphovascular mesenteric dissection at the time of surgical resection and the pathologic identification of nodes in the specimen. Retrospective studies, such as Intergroup trial INT-0089 [EST-2288], have demonstrated that the number of lymph nodes examined in colon and rectal surgery may be associated with patient outcome.[5,6,7,8]The staging system does not apply to the following histologies:Sarcoma. (See the

    3. Colorectal Cancer, Metastatic or Recurrent - About This PDQ Summary

      Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary for health professionals provides comprehensive, peer-reviewed, evidence-based information about colorectal cancer prevention. It is intended as a resource to inform and assist clinicians who care for cancer patients. It does not provide formal guidelines or recommendations for making health care decisions.Reviewers and UpdatesThis summary is reviewed regularly and updated as necessary by the PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Board members review recently published articles each month to determine whether an article should:be discussed at a meeting,be cited with text, orreplace or update an existing article that is already cited.Changes to the summaries are made through a consensus process

    4. Colorectal Cancer, Metastatic or Recurrent - To Learn More About Rectal Cancer

      For more information from the National Cancer Institute about rectal cancer, see the following:Colon and Rectal Cancer Home PageWhat You Need to Know About™ Cancer of the Colon and RectumColorectal Cancer PreventionColorectal Cancer ScreeningTests to Detect Colorectal Cancer and PolypsUnusual Cancers of ChildhoodCryosurgery in Cancer Treatment: Questions and AnswersDrugs Approved for Rectal CancerTargeted Cancer TherapiesUnderstanding Cancer Series: Targeted Therapies(Advances in Targeted Therapies)Genetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer SyndromesFor general cancer information and other resources from the National Cancer Institute, see the following:What You Need to Know About™ CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: CancerCancer StagingChemotherapy and You: Support for People With CancerRadiation Therapy and You: Support for People With CancerCoping with Cancer: Supportive and Palliative CareQuestions to Ask Your Doctor About CancerCancer LibraryInformation For

    5. Colorectal Cancer, Metastatic or Recurrent - Colorectal Cancer Screening

      Tests are used to screen for different types of cancer.Some screening tests are used because they have been shown to be helpful both in finding cancers early and decreasing the chance of dying from these cancers. Other tests are used because they have been shown to find cancer in some people; however, it has not been proven in clinical trials that use of these tests will decrease the risk of dying from cancer. Scientists study screening tests to find those with the fewest risks and most benefits. Cancer screening trials also are meant to show whether early detection (finding cancer before it causes symptoms) decreases a person's chance of dying from the disease. For some types of cancer, finding and treating the disease at an early stage may result in a better chance of recovery. Clinical trials that study cancer screening methods are taking place in many parts of the country. Information about ongoing clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.Studies show that screening for

    6. Colorectal Cancer, Metastatic or Recurrent - Summary of Evidence

      Note: Separate PDQ summaries on Prevention of Colorectal Cancer; Colon Cancer Treatment; and Rectal Cancer Treatment are also available. Based on solid evidence,screening for colorectal cancer reduces colorectal cancer mortality,but there is little evidence that it reduces all cause mortality,possibly because of an observed increase in other causes of death. Table 1: Effect of Screening ...

    7. Colorectal Cancer, Metastatic or Recurrent - Evidence of Benefit

      Fecal Occult Blood Test (FOBT)In FOBT testing, a person collects stool samples that are analyzed for the presence of small amounts of blood. Collection details vary somewhat for different tests, but typically involve collection of as many as three different specimens on 3 different days, with small amounts from one specimen smeared by a wooden stick on a card with two windows or otherwise placed in a specimen container.The guaiac test identifies peroxidase-like activity that is characteristic of human and nonhuman hemoglobin. Thus, it will record blood from ingested meat, upper airway bleeding such as epistaxis, upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, as well as colonic lesions.Five controlled clinical trials have been completed or are in progress to evaluate the efficacy of screening utilizing the FOBT. The Swedish trial is a targeted study for individuals aged 60 to 64 years.[1] The

    8. Colorectal Cancer - Treatment Options for Colon Cancer

      Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ)Treatment of stage 0 (carcinoma in situ) may include the following types of surgery:Local excision or simple polypectomy.Resection and anastomosis. This is done when the tumor is too large to remove by local excision.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with stage 0 colon cancer. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the name of the drug. General information about clinical trials is available from the NCI Web site.Stage I Colon CancerTreatment of stage I colon cancer usually includes the following:Resection and anastomosis.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with stage I colon cancer. For more specific results, refine the search by using other search features, such as the location of the trial, the type of treatment, or the

    9. Colorectal Cancer - Description of the Evidence

      BackgroundIncidence and mortalityColorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common malignant neoplasm worldwide [1] and the second leading cause of cancer deaths (irrespective of gender) in the United States.[2] It is estimated that there will be 142,820 new cases diagnosed in the United States in 2013 and 50,830 deaths due to this disease.[2] Between 2005 and 2009, CRC incidence rates in the United States declined by 4.1% per year among adults aged 50 years and older.[2] For the past 20 years, the mortality rate has been declining in both men and women. Between 2005 and 2009, the mortality rate declined by 2.4% per year in men and by 3.1% per year in women. In adults younger than 50 years, CRC incidence rates increased by about 1.1% per year.[2] The overall 5-year survival rate is 64%. About 5% of Americans are expected to develop the disease

    10. Colon Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Who is at Risk?

      For the great majority of people,the major factor that increases a person's risk for colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing age. Risk increases dramatically after age 50 years; 90% of all CRCs are diagnosed after this age. The history of CRC in a first-degree relative,especially if before the age of 55 years,roughly doubles the risk. Other risk factors are weaker than age and family history. ...

    Displaying 61 - 70 of 216 Articles << Prev Page 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Next >>

    Today on WebMD

    Colorectal cancer cells
    The right diagnosis is the most important factor.
    man with a doctor
    Our health check will steer you in the right direction.
     
    sauteed cherry tomatoes
    Fight cancer one plate at a time.
    bladder cancer x-ray
    Do you know the warning signs?
     
    bread
    ARTICLE
    Colon vs Rectal Cancer
    VIDEO
     
    New Colorectal Treatments
    VIDEO
    can lack of sleep affect your immune system
    FEATURE
     
    Cancer Facts Quiz
    QUIZ
    Virtual Colonoscopy
    VIDEO
     
    Picture of the Colon
    ANATOMY
    Vitamin D
    SLIDESHOW