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What kinds of help work for depression in marriage?

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Seeing a therapist together can give a couple valuable perspective, says Dan Jones, PhD, director of the Counseling and Psychological Services Center at Appalachian State University, Boone, N.C. "The therapist mediates," he says. "It's not a blaming session, but rather the therapist helps the depressed person recognize they are contributing to [the problem]. If they improve the depression, they could improve the marriage."

One study found no difference between couples therapy and individual therapy on the symptoms of depression. But couples therapy better reduced "relationship distress".

Often, talking about the depression -- whether alone or with a partner in therapy -- brings up other issues in a marriage that, when addressed, help ease the depression, says Joan R. Sherman, LMFT, licensed marriage and family therapist, Lancaster, Pa.