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    Pushing Prozac

    What are the risks?

    WebMD Feature

    June 2, 2000 -- For five years, antidepressant drugs have redefined daily life for Carla, a graphic designer in Des Moines, Iowa. They've helped her pry loose from depression so powerful she could barely get out of bed in the morning. They've helped her raise three teenage sons and put an end to her occasional thoughts of suicide.

    But such help has come at a price -- a price some doctors are starting to question. Twelve years after Prozac first hit the market, a growing chorus of psychiatrists claims that America is becoming an overmedicated society, reaching for prescriptions at the first sign of mild depression -- and risking potentially dangerous side effects in the process.

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    Like Carla, one in eight Americans have taken one of the popular new class of antidepressants called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, according to an ABC News survey done in April. Better known by the brand names Prozac, Paxil, Zoloft, or Luvox, these drugs are thought to boost brain levels of the chemical serotonin and to quell an array of emotional disorders, from depression to panic to anxiety. Indeed, the drugs are so popular that an estimated 28 million Americans -- one in 10 -- currently use them. To date, over 60 million prescriptions for this class of drug have been written. That's a stunningly high figure considering that the National Mental Health Association estimates that only 19 million Americans suffer from severedepression.

    Stephen Crystal, PhD, a Rutgers researcher who studies prescription trends, calls it a "massive uncontrolled experiment," in which doctors are handing their patients prescriptions when they haven't even been diagnosed with a mental disorder in the first place. Equally troubling, the ABC News survey found that nearly half of people on the new antidepressants have taken the drugs for a year or more, even though these drugs haven't been tested for long-term use.

    Leading the dissent is Harvard psychiatrist Joseph Glenmullen, MD, author of Prozac Backlash. Glenmullen argues that as many as 75% of patients are on antidepressants for mild -- even trivial -- conditions. For many of these people, he says, the risk-benefit ratio of taking antidepressants is simply unacceptable.

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